I’m Paid To Catch Crooks, Not Get Them Elected – Welcome To The Punch

28 12 2016

Welcome to the Punch (Momentum Pictures - 2013)

If I were to ask you to compare the ways of life in both the UK and in the USA, you could probably come up with a big hefty list, but I could easily bet a substantial sum of money that one of the first things you would note is that in America, ordinary people are allowed to carry a Gun. It is embedded in the constitution of said country that ‘ordinary’ people are allowed to bear arms, so it comes as no surprise to the rest of us that there are a lot of shootings in America…which eventually (of course) lead to major Massacre’s more than once a year; but what do you expect from a country that has such a relaxed attitude to the distribution of deadly weaponry! In the UK we have a stricter form of gun control by only allowing certain people to have access to such weapons where as in America such a tight control of guns is factually impossible due to the large numbers of people (or more specifically gun nutters) who think easy access to guns is actually a ‘good thing’ (even though it’s probably due to this form of idealism that is causing most of the problems). I am not saying that everything is plain sailing in the UK though when it comes to gun access as they can still be attained for criminal purposes; but for this reason the UK does have its police divisions which are specially trained to use Firearms if such a time is needed (but even so this does not stop Daily Mail readers (probably) believing that our police officers should be packing – there is no pleasing some people is there).

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Released in 2013 by Momentum Pictures and directed by Eran Creevy; Welcome to the Punch is a British Action Cop Thriller about a Policeman who ends up teaming with a noted Gangster he has a score to settle with after uncovering a deadly conspiracy within the British Police Force. The film’s script is noted for being voted third on the 2010 Brit List of the best un-produced film scripts.

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One night in London around Canary Wharf, a heist is pulled off by a team of crooks led by Jacob Sternwood (Mark Strong) who escape on Motorcycles. In hot pursuit is Detective Inspector Max Lewinsky (James McAvoy) who defies orders by chasing after them unarmed, only to be shot in the leg by Sternwood. 3 years later, Sternwood’s son Ruan (Elyes Gabel) is arrested at a London Airport after a failed heist and is in a critical condition in Hospital. Max still works for the police force, but is held in low regard by his Chief Inspector; Nathan Bartnick (Daniel Mays) due to his actions and everyday has to remove water from his shot leg. He teams up with Detective Sergeant Sarah Hawks (Andrea Riseborough) in trying to convict former army man Dean Warns (Johnny Harris), but who is let off the hook after a witness changes their statement. When news reaches Max regarding Sternwood’s son, he sees this as a chance to get revenge.

After a failed attempt to capture him, Sternwood arrives in the UK to take care of his son and asks for help from old friend Roy Edwards (Peter Mullan). With a recent spate of shootings in London, Commander Thomas Geiger (David Morrissey) is campaigning for his officers to be given better equipment in dealing with crime and sees this whole Sternwood resurgence as a way to score points in his favour. He allows Max and Sarah to take command of surveillance at an open hospital where Ruan Sternwood is being treated, hoping that Jacob Sternwood might take the bait. Things end badly however, as Max’s determination results in a gun being shoved in a civilian’s face, Ruan later dies in Hospital. Jacob Sternwood meanwhile undertakes his own investigation into what happened to his son, and lays a trap at a local Hotel where Nathan and another policeman; Harvey Crown (Jason Flemyng) take the bait, and after a small gun fight Harvey gets killed. Sarah meanwhile finds evidence regarding to a containment delivery on the river Thames. When she arrives she finds a container filled with weapons, but before she can escape she is killed by Dean Warns.

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With Commander Geiger’s blessing, Max is sent out to bring down Sternwood once and for all, and a lead on Nathan takes him to a small club, where Max runs into Sternwood, but before he can kill him, both men are ambushed by Warns and Bartnick. Bartnick is killed in the resulting fight, with Sternwood saving Max and escaping in a van. Sternwood orders Max to take him to his son in the Morgue, but while there they run into Detective Juka Ogadowa (Daniel Kaluuya) who tells Max that he is wanted for Sarah’s murder. Sternwood and Max manage to escape and go to Dean Warns’s Nan’s house where they use his Nan (Ruth Sheen) to get him to take them to the containment yard where the container full of guns are. While there, they also trap and capture Commander Geiger who informs them that he set up the means for the recent spate of gun crime in the Capital and helped to ship in the guns, so that when the correct political party took over, he could supply officers with the equipment they needed to protect themselves better. At that moment, armed men sent by Geiger’s PR Jane (Natasha Little) attack the yard, but Max and Sternwood are able to defeat them, killing both Warns and Geiger in the process. With the police on their way to the scene, Max considers shooting Sternwood, but lets him go, and is arrested on the spot as Sternwood flees the scene.

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Welcome to the Punch is a very interesting film, but one that I would not usually concern myself with watching. Yes there are a lot of independent British gangster based films that are produced year in year out but most of these don’t really grab my attention. When I first saw the trailer, I thought it was a very good trailer and was sort of suckered in with the line that stated that one of the executive producers was Ridley Scott (I know); but the trailer still grabbed me enough to keep it in mind. I eventually got round to going to the cinema to see it and was absolutely blown away by it. While not necessarily the best film of 2013 (my 4th favourite overall), it was a film that while released early on, was one that remained in my mind and would not let go of.

James McAvoy

Welcome to the Punch is not really a gangster film, nor is it a knuckle dusting, all guns blazing shooter movie, what it is, is a solid British Police/Cop film. What do I mean by this? Well, it is a crime film with elements of gangster films but is not one in search of blood lust. What we have is a decent detective who has had his pride shot after an incident wanting some form of restitution. Due to his past failings though he is held in low esteem by his superiors and is sort of made a joke of and as such has fallen on hard times in his personal life. Meanwhile, the super criminal who has pulled off a heist which he can safely retire on, is forced to return to his home country when his son is in danger. This means he has returned, and the detective sees this as an opportunity to settle a score with him plus return into the good books with others. While all this is coming to a head however, the incidents surrounding this turn of events begin to unravel and a much darker conspiracy comes to the fold which means that the two great enemies will have to leave it for later as there is something they both need to settle first and need each other to pull it off. What we have here basically (or as basic as I can get it) is a big action packed detective story with a boiling vendetta ready to erupt engulfing the entire city with it, but still comes with that murder mystery formula that works so well along with the big explanation as to what has exactly been going on and the real crooks revealed, but in the end succumbs to a very tragic end for the hero. It’s like a great crime novel, something that if it wasn’t McAvoy and Strong, could well be Harry Bosch (have not read a single novel, but my researched understanding suggests that he would fit the bill).

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To back up its story, Welcome to the Punch comes with a small but still powerful cast of actors and actresses who deliver some amazing characters in the process, seemingly suggesting that without the actors, the characters would just not have worked. The film does of course have it’s one timers of interest who deliver little such as Ruan, Karen Edwards (Dannielle Brent) and Harvey Crown, to more included characters who still have a little but not a lot such as Juka and Jane, but all of these really go far to enhance the film’s story and setting (not to forget the city of London itself, especially when you listen to the wise words of Luther creator Neil Cross who sums up London’s character status better than anyone else), but the film’s small cast enables these varied roles to really stand out and warrant such a pedigree of acting. I do find Johnny Harris’s role a ,little clichéd in the form that he is a bruiser with little social life and has to engage a lot of heavy breathing, I just couldn’t see why he could not be more like Mike in Breaking Bad or even Buck in Far Cry 3, real characters with a unique personality but are still hitmen to a cause; however his insertion as a gun for hire really allows himself to develop a characteristic which suggests a real hitman, less an armed thug with little allowance to talk. The character of Nathan Bartnick is as unpleasant as the early morning traffic jam on a rainy day, but I suppose that’s the point. He does not come across as pleasant, but given that he is the first end level boss of the film, you can’t really introduce him as a nice man, more of a feeder into something bigger, and let a more major character present himself favorably in the eyes of the audience only to flip at the last-minute.

David Morrissey’s character is that of someone you could confuse of being a mayor if it was not explained that he is actually a police man. He is introduced really well and works hard to present himself as being a supportive influence on Max and who comes across well with the audience as a result. He is a strong leader with a lot of hope and a big heart, really showing that he sees the best in people. All that turns around in a trice however as he is revealed to be the big bad instigator of the film’s events, less a leader, more of a manipulator, whose long career has provided an insight into the criminal underworld, and one he knows how to manipulate to get his wish. His heart is in the right place, and is not looking for a position of power, not a megalomaniac, more a lunatic who thinks that with enough prodding he can get the best outcome. It’s a real shock turn of events that leaves you reeling, as for the great majority of the film; he is one of the good guys. Peter Mullan is an inspired casting choice as his veterancy on the British independent scene means he can slip into a variety of persona’s and can come across anyway he likes. For instance, in this he is introduced as something of an old gangster and a possible mentor to Sternwood, however he comes across as something of a respected member of the community with a lot of power under his belt, and while he is on the initial bad side, he does prove his worth and becomes a trusted ally to all those who side with him. He maybe a retired gangster, but he still comes with a real whack of a punch while still allowing a real sense of sanity to creep in on those around him.

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The way that a crime lord is presented can seem very samey at times, which is why it’s nice that in this case we have someone a lot different. Jacob Sternwood is a criminal who has earned a great deal of respect from his peers and is a real tactician in the execution of a crime, his attitude to what he does though comes across as less a scheming villain, more someone looking for the opportunity to get away and be set up for life. He is suggested of being a hard worker, someone who if he was not a criminal would more than likely be real working class hero whose hard work pays off in dividends. He is a criminal though, but in the same style as what I have suggested, he is a criminal hero of sorts and is just looking for enough to live a nice relaxed life. This is strongly suggested more when his son gets into trouble, as he cares greatly for him, even more so to re-enter harm’s way to check up on him and pursue a vendetta on his behalf. Into this we have the rookie detective sent to bring him down; someone who took it too far and is now forever paying the cost for it, and has a low self-esteem due to his past behavior. He does have a strong support network around him, but his determination to get back onto the good track of life means that he does not really see it until it is too late, and as things spiral more out of control for him, he really begins to understand that there is no real way out for him, and sadly, that’s what does happen. Though while Max does go all out to prevent total Chaos, it ends tragically for him, creating a deep uncertain future that there is no coming back from. James McAvoy and Mark Strong work well off each other, as McAvoy still presents that young but experienced character with deep forgotten hopes and repressed memories, while Mark Strong presents that real strong determination but one that makes him human; not machine nor monster; together creating two very relatable characters.

James McAvoy and Mark Strong

More than anything about this film, the real highlight has to be Sarah Hawks played by the incredible Andrea Riseborough. I could not get enough of her character. She is not an assistant to Max, nor is a running partner in learning, but someone who deeply cares for him and is making it a personal mission to find a way to bring the real Max back. In many scenes she surpasses Max and you really begin to feel for her, and can see a lot of hope and future for her, thinking that she will be the big hero (or at least should have been the lead character). She presents incredible energy in a tough world, not delivering charisma or charm but more a sultry aggression, one that is fighting to be let out, but continues to maintain a level of professionalism. It strikes me though, that with a film about the police and crime, that none of them can spot the real crime in progress, that of the death of Riseborough’s character. It still annoys me to this day that Riseborough’s character was killed off as I simply wanted more of her in this film. She is more what McAvoy should have been than he plays, so why could they not have killed him in a shock twist and allowed her to take over from him. She was incredibly enjoyable and whose death is the real crime of this story.

Andrea Riseborough and James McAvoy

Welcome to the Punch does not carry a heavy burden of Special Effects, but does come with some terrifically choreographed gun fight scenes including some nicely, all be it brutally realistic scenes of the use of injection needles in James McAvoy’s leg, plus a whole heap of excellently devised shooting matches and even a pretty good bike car chase scene in a surprisingly quiet late night Canary Wharf. Any other scenes of adrenaline pumping action really come down to the human level of chases scenes on foot, plus the raw primal instincts of the cast as they deliver very realistic characters, all who appear to be on the edge of mental breakdowns in such a stressful world (come to think of it, the bike chase scene in the underground tunnels does sort of make me think of the opening scene in Blade: The Series). The film’s soundtrack meanwhile (composed by Harry Escott) is a very varied selection of tracks that that range from small low key pieces, to high-octane shouts, all dependent on the scene in hand. For the most part the film relies mostly on a sophisticated level of silence as the characters are talking and only brings in the noise as the time for talking comes to a close. Even when the music is needed, it decides to play tracks that suggest more a moment of thought rather than a moment of action; not necessarily a bad thing, just very different. Scenes that carry a piece of note include the opening heist, Max’s Flat, the attack on Sternwood’s Icelandic villa, the near kiss, the early container, post Sarah’s death, nightclub shootout, the Morgue and the Credits (not forgetting the wonderful piece of music from the film’s trailer, no idea what it is sadly).

Welcome to the Punch is a very satisfying crime thriller. It is a film that is at a good length and carries enough mystery, but not too much to heavy interlace with the scenes of action so as not to confuse itself nor the audience. It is a film with a good sophistication of action sequences, while also presenting a prolific cast of characters and delivering a deep sense of emotion. Yes, it does have its down parts (such as DS Hawks’s Death!) but it also has a lot to make up for that (except DS Hawks’s Death!) and carries on to create a brutally realistic film with a tragic un-turn-around-able ending that makes you question what the future holds and if the villains actually got away with it or not. At the same time though it does go on to question real world ideas such as gun control, the arming of British Police officers; and also delves deep into some of the deepest levels of corruption that we may never see in some of our most trusted institutions. Altogether, I think it is a rather superb film that does something very different to those around it, creating a rather unique if but small experience for all those willing to give it a shot.

GENEPOOL (Happy New Year).





I Think The Word PPI Should Be Banned, Who’s With Me?

30 11 2016

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Unless you have no TV, Phone, Email Account, Facebook, Twitter, Video Games Console, Front Door, House, Windows, Friends and Never go outside; then it may be possible that you have never heard of PPI. PPI (of course) stands for Payment Protection Insurance and is according to Wikipedia: “An insurance product that enables consumers to insure repayment of credit if the borrower dies, becomes ill or disabled, loses a job, or faces other circumstances that may prevent them from earning income to service the debt. It is not to be confused with income protection insurance, which is not specific to a debt but covers any income.” Well since about roughly 3 years ago (if not more), rumours spread that banks and loan company’s might have miss-sold it to their customers, and there was an opportunity for those who were miss-sold it to reclaim it. That was great news if you were miss-sold as it meant that you could reclaim money. Being sure is very important in these circumstances, and you would prefer to have a definitive yes or no, and if it was the case that you were miss-sold money and be given the opportunity to have that money returned to you, you would jump on it. On the opposite side of the coin, if you knew for a fact that the answer was originally No to the question “have you ever been miss-sold PPI?” then you would be happy as it would confirm that you have not necessarily lost money either. When it comes down to those who found out the answer was ‘Yes’ however; they needed to be given the opportunity and service to reclaim that money. However for those who found out that the answer was indeed ‘No’, then you would think that they would just be left alone to get on with their lives, not be talked down to by TV Adverts or be phoned round the clock by harassment agents belonging to call centres for 3 flipping years.

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Ever since the word PPI made it onto the streets of the UK (if not the world), agencies were set up to try and ‘help’ you get your money back, (possibly for a cut of the returns) if you were one of those people who was genuinely miss-sold PPI, however for those of us who weren’t, we were still included in the seasonal fun of asking if we had. It’s nice to see some inclusion from these agencies for once, but after the number of times they have asked, told them that I hadn’t or that I was not interested, they still keep calling back. Now it is probably down to some kind of automated machine which brings up my house number for some lone drone to then ring me, but after 3+ years of being given the opportunity for any PPI to be refunded, you’d think everyone would have received it by now wouldn’t you? But supposedly the answer is No, and so they continue to ring up and ask to the point where they must be committing Harassment by now. It’s for this reason that I think the word (or at least those 3 letters of the three words in that order that make up those 3 letters in that order) PPI should be banned! These companies have now had plenty of time to find and return the money miss-sold, and now it’s time for this whole affair to end!

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Now there is one thing of course that could be a problem if it were to stop, and that is those poor people; who have been employed to ask everyone else, would be unemployed as a result. Alternatively, if they were allowed to spread their wings and be given an opportunity to go find other work, then they would be able to learn and maintain real skills and achieve proper prospects for themselves (more at least than they must be getting right now ). It’s a win for everyone: we stop getting harassed, and people in a slum of a job right now get a chance at far greater work opportunities. We of course still need to give those who may still be waiting (if any by now) to receive their money back, but I think the sooner the better. I was thinking maybe around March 2017. You know, these companies would then be given some time to have a proper hard go at their supposed job, but then come the first second of April 2017, they would have stop outright, and the term PPI would be banned, and any use of it down the phone could see the charging of a hefty fine (if not a Prison Sentence). Then we can get on with our lives and be safe in the knowledge that nobody will call us regarding our current PPI Status or be ruining TV with the use of that word either. Now if it was the case that some people still had money to reclaim, then in that case it should go down to professional investigators whose soul task it would be to do a proper professional audit trail and reward it justly (like the people on Heir Hunters), not harassingly. If by the end of that, there is still money to claim, but no one to claim it, then why not spend it on giving free ice cream to the people of the UK (not those who work at reclaim PPI companies, they don’t deserve it), and then we can get on with our lives. Now I realise of course that I have no real power to ban the letters or word PPI, and it will take some form of petition and act of government to achieve this, but as an idea, do you agree? Alternatively however, we could find other uses for the Letters PPI, maybe some kind of whimsically funny pun on something else, and then if that were to work; every time one of these people phoned up and said PPI, then we could just laugh at the funny lettering, and get some level of Joy from PPI instead? What do you think?

GENEPOOL





Pulling A Trigger Is Like Ordering A Takeout – The Raid

11 03 2015

The Raid (XYZ Films - 2011)

What is the best way to evict a block of flats full of criminals? You could simply serve an Eviction Notice and then have an Eviction Day where you remove those who reside inside it. Alternatively you could just get a swat team together of 20 cops or so and then evict the place room by room. This idea does sound a lot more promising given the circumstances of the residents; however this plan could also easily backfire, as shown in The Raid.

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Written and Directed by Gareth Evans; The Raid (or The Raid: Redemption as it is known in America) is an Indonesian Martial Arts Action Film which has to go down as one of the all-time greatest action movies in the history of cinema. To be honest I have only recently seen this film. I had heard of it before, but it was not until I saw The Raid 2 (my second Favourite Film of 2014) back in May that I wanted to and got round to seeing the first Raid film.

The film is set in the slums of Jakarta. Police officer Rama (Iko Uwais) is a member of a 20 strong swat team squad led by Sergeant Jaka (Joe Taslim), Officer Bowo (Tegar Satrya) and Lieutenant Wahyu (Pierre Gruno). Their mission is to raid a block of flats and capture crime lord Tama Riyadi (Ray Sahetapy) who lets out his flats to criminals hoping to evade the authorities. His building is like a fortress and supposedly today’s mission is not the first time something like this has been done. Tama also has two lieutenants; one said to be like a Mad Dog (Yayan Ruhian) and the other called Andi (Donny Alamsyah) who has control over him – and is also Rama’s brother. The swat team arrives and quickly gains access to the building. They briefly detain a man who is trying to deliver pills to his sick wife before proceeding to clear each floor and all of its residents one by one. Just as they clear the first few floors, the team is spotted by a young kid who manages to raise the alarm. Tama tells the buildings residents of the situation and calls a few people from around the area to prevent the team’s escape.

The team is then ambushed by the residents who kill a great number of them. Jaka learns from Wahyu that the operation has not been officially sanctioned; as such, no reinforcements will come to their aid as they do not know where they are. The remaining officers take refuge in an apartment where Rama creates an escape route by hacking away at the floor with an axe. Bowo gets injured in the chaos and Rama takes out a large number of residents by using the fridge as an explosive device. The team then splits up with Rama taking Bowo to safety and Jaka, Wahyu and Dagu (Eka ‘Piranha’ Rahmadia) go hide in a shower block. Tama meanwhile sends Mad Dog and Andi to go empty the dead resident’s coffers to pay for the buildings repair. Rama takes Bowo to the apartment of Gofar (Iang Darmawan); the man they detained earlier. He reluctantly hides them in a wall space. A machete gang then come looking but do not find them. Rama leaves Bowo to look for Jaka but then runs into the machete gang. He fights them off in an epic struggle only to find himself having to run away from another group. He is then found by Andi.

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Jaka meanwhile is cornered by Mad Dog. Wahyu and Dagu flee with Mad Dog challenging Jaka to a fight, which Mad Dog wins with ease. Rama tells Andi that he knew Andi was there and tries to convince him to come home, telling him that he is going to be an uncle to Rama’s son. Andi though decides to stay, but tells Rama to wait until the coast is clear. Mad Dog drags Jaka’s body back to Tama. Tama however spots Andi with Rama and Mad Dog turns on Andi and takes him prisoner. Rama meets up with Dagu and Wahyu and suggests they go after Tama to get safe passage out of the building.  They fight their way up the building, through a narcotics lab and to Tama’s room. Rama sees his brother being beaten up by Mad Dog and splits to help him out. Mad Dog releases Andi just so he can fight both brothers. Mad Dog gains the upper hand and is about to win until Andi stabs him in the neck weakening him enough to kill him.

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Wahyu meanwhile finds Tama but betrays Dagu by killing him. He takes Tama hostage, but Tama tells him he knew about the operation for several days and tells Wahyu that he has been betrayed by his higher-ups. Wahyu kills Tama, before he tries to kill himself, but runs out of bullets to do so. Andi gives Rama tape recordings of Tama taking bribes from corrupt cops to be used as evidence. Rama tries to convince Andi one more time to come home, but Andi tells him that while he can protect Rama in his world, Rama could not do the same for him. Andi uses his power over the residents to grant safe passage for Rama, an injured Bowo and a detained Wahyu out of the area.

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The Raid’s story and setting is actually quite simple, at least to begin with. The setting of a raid means there is plenty of moments for action as well as break points to explain story elements and delve into characters’ lives. The film’s setup in its first act-30 minutes is pretty much all done and the film gets going very quickly. The character development that takes place within this time is rather simple in itself without revealing too much and does not take too long to get to the core themes and setting of the film. The story does get a little more complicated as it goes along but it gives plenty of moments of reveals and questions answered so nothing goes unanswered by the film’s end while also leaving enough detail in to allow a future film. Iko Uwais character of Rama is brilliant setup and ready within the first 5 minutes and his character is explored a lot with in the first 30. Beginning with his personal life, his wife and expected child not only shows that he is in fact human instead of just being a cop. These scenes also give the audience reason to root for him as well as feel for him as he has something to live for, and as an audience member you want to see him survive what he is going through.

Iko Uwais

The Raid has a lot of really enjoyable primary and secondary characters. Sergeant Jaka is enjoyable from start to finish. While his character is of the hard-nosed leader of the operation along with Wahyu, he has a great deal of compassion for those under his charge. While from start to finish his hard-nosed outlook on the current situation is ever-present his caring side always blossoms. His death at the hands of Mad Dog is a compassionate note for the film as from start to finish he remains one of the film’s best characters.  Andi meanwhile is an interesting character. His position is an interesting contrast to that of Rama and being his brother adds a little of flavour to both characters and the situation. While Rama is obviously a good honest person trying to do his best, Andi is in a position of power within the Indonesian underground. Andi however does a moral level of humanity in him as he still cares for his brother and helps him leave, but also has a level of control of Mad Dog which prevents him doing something completely brutal. Mad Dog meanwhile is completely like his name sake. He rarely talks in the film at all but has a deep level of mistrust of Andi as well as a high level of respect of Tama. Mad Dog sort of sees the situation as an opportunity to do what he loves, which is that of fighting his way and killing people. Much like Jaka, Mad Dog is extremely enjoyable to watch, particularly during his fight sequences but also when he hardly does anything at all. He has a strong on-screen presence and adds a touch of flavor as well as conflict to the scenes he is in. His enjoyment for a fight also brings a lot of promise for the films huge amount of action and fight scenes.

Yayan Ruhian

Tama meanwhile is a very casual villain who does not appear to really lose his rag and is calm for most of the situation. It makes a nice change from criminals and gangsters constantly losing their rag and instead having a level of enjoyment and exuberance in what they do. Tama’s situation and presence also allows him to have an extra level of commitment to what he does as well as a level of enjoyment. Especially in the early moments when he calls for help, tells the residents his offer and takes in what the cost of repairing the place is. Gofar meanwhile is a nice example of what good honest folk are forced to do in a situation when they have next to little or no money at all. Gofar and his wife are forced to live in the terrible conditions of the flat they have chosen; however it is clear that they might not have an option. While the police’s outlook on the situation is that it is full of criminals, there is also their failure to understand what motive is behind people’s choices and that not everyone is a bad person. Gofar, though grumpy, does have a little bit of compassion for the police’s plight and does believe in the goodness of other people, particularly Rama, who he hides and looks after Bowo while Rama looks for the others.

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Wahyu meanwhile is a symbol for the corruption in the police and the desire to be one of the higher-ups and not necessarily a grunt, even though his look and age shows a modicum of respect his way, especially how Jaka initially feels towards him. Wahyu however is there to get his chance at the big time when in reality his actions are just going to bring bad news and disaster to him, both from the corrupted and the uncorrupted with in the police. While she may only get one scene, Rama’s wife (Fikha Effendi) does add a nice touch to the Rama character. Without the scene with her in it would have been harder to feel for Rama’s character. Her presence in the scene is one of caring too, but as the situation of the film is yet to be revealed, her ending shot reveals a level of sympathy for Rama but adds a question for the audience to think about before it is answered very shortly. Several of the film’s minor cops have a nice brief moment here and there, but one of the characters that of particular notice is the machete gang’s leader (Alfridus Godfred). He is a brutal killer and leader. When he searches Gofar’s apartment, his attitude in his language towards him is a brilliant scene. He is unrelenting and horrible and gives a savage depiction of a brutal killer. His on-screen presence is almost as if not as strong as that of Mad Dog. He is more of a mid-level boss character to the film, next up being Mad Dog but adds a level of spice to the action and human scenes but also adds a level of longevity to the film to allow it to continue without being too quick a film and increase tension and expectancy for the audience towards the film’s final moments.

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The Raid’s soundtrack is nicely composed by Mike Shinoda (though this is the soundtrack for The Raid: Redemption). It features many brilliant pieces for specific moments while also maintaining a similar theme in themselves and to the film’s situational theme. The opening piece for instance starts with a more peaceful harmonious note than to its ending which brings a level of severity to the situation and prepares the audience for what is about to begin. The film’s soundtrack in general is quite similar to one another but helps to ramp up the tension but also give a level of background activity to the situation and help to place it. A few that really stood out for me include the opening serious drumming beat, and the moment where Tama calls in help from the neighbours.

It has a lot of similarity to the films credits score. The credit’s score itself starts off rather peaceful as it begins when the violence is all over. It then builds to a point and as the film truly ends, it leaves on a high note of acceptance and relief as the situation is over, even if the future is uncertain. The film’s soundtrack altogether is rather enjoyable and well worth a definite listen out for.

The film’s action moments though are quite easily its most enjoyable and stand out feature. The level of violence is at the level of extreme at its lowest point. The level of extreme violence though plus the effects of what this violence does to the characters, including their injuries is something of a necessity as it makes this film really stand out from the start. The level of violence also makes the film incredibly realistic and shows a high level of detail in the film’s choreography, and make up. It also gives the films characters an extra level of detail in the Martial Art of Pencak Silat which is on show and choreographed by the film’s stars Iko Uwais and Yayan Ruhian. While to the casual observer the violence could look unnecessary, over the top and uncalled for, the martial arts on show as well as the result of the films violent actions give it that extra level of detail that makes this film truly stand out. Alongside this violence includes terrific use of weapons and moments including the jump out of the window, the machete through the wall and every fight scene featuring Ruhian and Uwais. Alongside this though there are some other brilliant scenes that do not rely on violence including the early shots of the Jakarta slums and the rain pouring down on the van.

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The Raid is altogether one fantastic film. It’s level of violence and action could be a turn off for many a movie goer, but it’s more than just huge amounts of violence. It’s a film with a great level of emotion and drama in a simple but detailed and interesting story delivered by the films terrific cast. The setting is rather simple and so is the story but still maintaining enough mystery too adds twists and turns. The films characters are all terrific in their own spotlights with plenty of showcased reasons to cheer and root for them as well as boo them and enjoy their brutal ends. The soundtrack is a fitting choice for the film and has been well crafted and composed. The level of violence is at the high point of realism and one that any film made since The Raid is going to struggle to replicate and provide. It’s an all-round great film with each point delivering as well as backing up each other point too. The Raid is a truly brilliant action film that is definitely worth a watch for both fans of action movies as well as unseasoned action movie goers. While its level of violence will undoubtedly put many people off, but for those who are willing to stomach it, are in for a real treat.

GENEPOOL





Batman Begins – A Bite Size Film Review

5 02 2015

Batman Begins (Legendary Pictures - 2005)

Director: Christopher Nolan

Writer: Christopher Nolan and David S. Goyer (Batman and characters created by Bob Kane).

Cast: Christian Bale, Katie Holmes, Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman, Gary OldmanCillian Murphy, with Ken Watanabe and Liam Neeson.

Composer: James Newton Howard and Hans Zimmer

Cinematography: Wally Pfister

Studio: Legendary Pictures, Warner Bros. Pictures, and Syncopy Inc.

Best Line: “It’s Not Who I Am Underneath, But What I Do That Defines Me.”

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After suffering the loss of his parents during his youth; Bruce Wayne dons the cape and mask to become the legendary caped crusader Batman, as he attempts to save Gotham City from the criminal underworld it is built on, as well as those around him. Set in a realistic setting other than a comic book world, Batman Begins is an interesting film as it becomes more of a crime/action film than a Superhero film. The film is beautifully produced. Gotham City looks gives the impression of a dying criminal city with very few things to appreciate in it. The action scenes, particularly the end train chase and mid car chase are spectacularly done and impressive to watch.

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The films cast are a brilliant selection and easily dive into their specified roles and are very believable but also easy to connect with. The emotional devices of Wayne’s love for Rachel, as well as the emotion he feels after his parent’s death and how this changes them can be felt on a high level even if it is more an action film than a drama. The film’s soundtrack is one of its most standout features. A nice mix of emotional pieces and action pieces, particularly the train chase at the end are used to raise tension to great effect. The film’s main theme is the main attraction as it is easily recognisable but also surprisingly catchy. Altogether Batman Begins is an enjoyable film and a definite must see.

GENEPOOL








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