I Am Not Cut Out For Space Exploration

1 04 2015

Space Planet

Recently I have been playing FTL: Faster Than Light on Steam. It is a rather fun game. It’s sort of a cross between a puzzle game and an RTS (Real Time Strategy) intermixed with the subject of space exploration. I quite like it and continue to play it, but it has taught me one important thing; and that is that I am not cut out for space exploration (even though the likelihood of me receiving the opportunity of going up into space in the first place is very unlikely).

FTL

Now basing such a statement on a video game could be seen as something of a rash statement, but here is why I think that. When I got it; it made me think of games like Evil Genius in terms of its internal look, as in the ships in FTL looks like the lair design in Evil Genius. I liked the idea of doing something similar to Star Trek or possibly Firefly (Even though I have not seen Firefly and do not consider myself a Star Trek Fan, even though I have watched the occasional episode of Next Generation and occasionally Voyager). Just the idea of going through space, exploring it and controlling the aspects of my ship while engaged in specific situations.

Space Shuttle

The thing is, for many years I have calculated that I would more than likely go insane if I went into space. Just the idea of being somewhere that I would not exactly consider safe, but also being left to drift in space, even if I was in a ship or station. But it’s from playing FTL that I came to the conclusion of the earlier statement. While I have begun to improve through understandings of previous missions that have all gone belly up, even so much to the point of me having yet to clear the first stage of galaxies (I have unlocked the second ship; The Torus, even though it is a pretty pointless ship) my planning and reactions in the heat of the situation usually lead me to defeat. Some of these though can come down to me causing the issues from bad planning and excessively opening the doors. When an intruder is on board, or in more common occurrences, a fire breaks out, my first plan is to cordon off the areas where my ship’s crew are, and then open the doors into space to suck out the oxygen. It works mostly, but eventually people break through the doors. When an intruder is on board though, I usually stick as much of my crew as I can, in the medical bay so that when the intruders get there, my crew get healed quickly. These ideas though don’t work all the time and sometimes my crew will die trying to put the fire out as the doors are broken and me having to regularly send them to the medical bay before they die. Unless of course the medical bay is damaged and needs fixing, or the oxygen is cut off.

Kestrel

Other cases though include my willingness to fight ships to gain resources off them and denying them surrender in the hope of getting more resources off them. Eventually this has led to complete destruction, uncontrollable fires, intruders on board and oxygen leaks. The number of dead Kestrel spaceships that must be floating through space thanks to me must be astronomical. While my learning of these situations has led me to the point that I need to upgrade what systems I can to expect these situations, I need to show restraint when given the opportunity to fight, as well as let them surrender every now and then.

Kestrel In Space

I don’t know if FTL is how space exploration works or not, but given that I am playing it on easy mode and I have met failure on several occasions, I can quite confidently say; that I am not cut out for Space Exploration.

Space Planets

GENEPOOL

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Top 5 Steam Early Access Games That I Want To Play

15 10 2014

Steam (Valve Corporation, 2003 - Present)

For a couple of years now, Steam has supported its early access option. Early Access is an option and opportunity for gamers to play games on Steam that are still being developed. The idea being that you can buy the game, play it and let the developer know of problems you spot when playing the game. It gives the developers the option of having the game tested for bugs and fixes while the gamers get to play the game sooner, providing that they know that the game is not finished. While a nice little idea it may be, I am not all that for it as I don’t really fancy playing a buggy game or have consistent issues while playing it as well as possible performance problems for my PC. Despite this though, my Top 5 Games on my Steam wish list are Early Access games and while there are many more other Early Access games I want to play like Kerbal Space Program, these for me stand out as the ones I really want to play.

Folk Tale

5. Folk Tale – Back in 2007 when I first got my PC I played a relatively new game at the time called The Settlers: Rise of an Empire. I liked the look of it as it had a daft looking cartoon element and I also liked the idea of how the game works with each little person doing a job and having to collect things to make things. Folk Tale looks a lot like The Settlers in how the player builds a town and helps it expand while the little AI people go about their daily lives, doing jobs to help other people do jobs and so on. On top of that, the game has a cartoon based look retaining a certain level of novelty and daftness without getting too serious. The fantasy based setting also means the game is not being held down by factual based historical facts which can slow games like this down and lose a bit of their imagination. From the looks of the trailer, it looks a lot like a combination of Age of Empires and Battle for Middle Earth with a taste of Settlers. While I don’t know much about this game as much as I do others, I really like the look of it and look forward to playing it at some point.

Godus

4. Godus – Inspired by games like Populous and Dungeon Keeper and designed by the same designer as those Games (Peter Molyneux), Project Godus is a brand new God Game where the player helps a little settlement build up into a village, then a town and possibly even a nation. The player shapes the land while the AI people build their own settlement. Godus to me looks brilliant. It looks like the kind of game where instead of building the settlement, you provide the tools to construct it and let someone else do the rest. To me it looks like the game REUS where you control the creation of resources and let those live in the world shape it with what you give them. Even though I still know very little about it, I think it looks rather funky and fun and the in-game systems that the game provides I really do like the look of including watching the little people build their town.

War For The Overworld

3. War For The Overworld – Back in the late 90’s when Dungeon Keeper 2 came out, I remember the in-game trailer for Dungeon Keeper 3, and it looked absolutely Amazing. Many years passed and it didn’t happen, I hoped and dreamed for over 10 years that one day Dungeon Keeper 3 would happen. But it still didn’t. Then a couple of years ago, I saw War For The Overworld (WFTO) being advertised on Kickstarter (in an e-mail from another Kickstarter game on this list). I took a quick glimpse at it, and fell in love with it. It’s not just a case of the game ‘looking like Dungeon Keeper’, in all respects it is Dungeon Keeper. The way there is a Dungeon Heart, the way creatures dig out rooms, the way rooms and walls look and the diversity of creatures on show. At long last Dungeon Keeper was coming back. I was hooked and since then have been getting regular emails on the project. While it is not completely Dungeon Keeper, I am really excited to the release of this game, which has been announced as sometime in early to mid-2015; so not long to wait until I can actually play it, and not only that, but the original voice for DK and DK2, Richard Ridings is returning to voice this game too. I just hope the satire that Dungeon Keeper had remains in this game.

Prison Architect

2. Prison Architect – From the creators of the incredible DEFCON, Prison Architect looks incredible. While inspired by games like Theme Hospital and Dungeon Keeper, to me it has the look of Rollercoaster Tycoon. I like games that look daft and cartoony; to me that makes them look more accessible and allows retention of creativity and imagination. The cartoon look of Prison Architect is brilliant. But it’s not just the look of this game that I like. I like the idea too. The idea of running a prison and the systems that are needed to be put in place to run it, and not just in construction, but in management too, making this game a lot like both RCT and Evil Genius too. While it may be still in production and thus several years away from actual non early access release, this is a game that I almost did buy as I want to play it so much, and on top of that, the current bugs in the game make it look funny to play too. With both a great design and look combined with a great niche idea, Prison Architect is easily one of the games well worth looking out for.

MAIA

1. M.A.I.A. – Out of all the games on this list though M.A.I.A. (Maia) is the most mysterious. It’s my interest in this game which led to me discovering WFTO, but this game looks puzzling. It’s design and look make it clear to be an RTS/Management game in a similar style to games like Theme Hospital, Startopia and Evil Genius with players building their own space base (I’m assuming) while also placing objects and systems in order to run it. Sounds simple, but I bet it isn’t. The thing is, most of my knowledge stems from some video footage, some in-game images and some text information. But apart from that I am still unsure of what his game is going to be like. But from what I know and see, it is a game I want to play as it combines all the things I like about games like this while also being put in a setting that has not really been done before. Combining that with an element of Sci-fi/Survival Horror that is somewhat visible in the games look and effects, and this game should be amazing, possibly even Legendary. I’ll just need to wait until it is ready to be played to find out, but I’m ready and looking forward to it.

GENEPOOL





REUS

13 08 2014

REUS Logo

Have you played Godus yet? I haven’t. Why? Because it’s still in early access and I don’t quite fancy playing a buggy game until it is supposedly finished to a point that it isn’t so buggy. It’s also why I have not played Folk Tale, MAIA, Prison Architect and War for the Overworld. All these are games I am eagerly anticipating to play, just not yet. But why am I talking about said games if the title suggests a 2D game with Giant Monsters in it. Well it sort of looks like games like Godus and Populous.

REUS World

REUS is a game about a world, a world that currently nothing exists, except for a group of Elemental Giants who each have the power over a certain type of land and abilities. One makes mountains and can create deserts and mines to mine (obviously) minerals. One can create oceans and sea life while another can create grass lands and fruit. Then finally there is a swamp giant who can create swamps and technology and sciences. What is basically a God Game where the giants are such entities and can create life and resources for the humans down below and provided the humans stay loyal to them, and not get to greedy, the giants and humans will stay in happiness together and some humans may join the giants unlocking new abilities for them. Although, the player has no direct control of the humans (a lot like Evil Genius) and if the humans get too greedy, they may declare war on each other, or even on the giants themselves which are not invincible. But if a race of man gets too powerful you can just destroy them, provided that you still have a giant that can?

REUS End

REUS is nicely designed and has a nice cartoony look about it and is also very colourful which is always a bonus. So even if the humans decide to go to war with each other, or sometimes you, at least it’s not all gloomy and horrible. The games mechanics are in the ability to give the peaceful/war like humans the things they need in order to survive/kill. So each giant while having maybe some similar abilities, each one does something different, and on top of that different types of region and the people that live on them require different kinds of resources. Grasslands initially require food, desert initially requires wealth and swamp initially requires Technology/Science. What do they require these resources for? Projects. As soon as a town is settled they begin building something which usually starts off quite basic and if accomplished thanks to the help of your giants, they grow in prestige (I think, it’s been a while since I last played it) and then may decide to upgrade that building into something better. By that point though, they require more resources and of different types. It is through this that they can get greedy and if you give them too much, equally so. But in order to achieve even these potential accomplishments the game introduces a system of multipliers. These are basically points in the resource system where combining certain things together will cause more abundance in those resources, and seemingly the strongest way of doing this is through the buildings themselves as they cause larger multipliers than the actions of the giants.

Reus Water Giant

The game while fun, colourful and perhaps playing in a more arcade style game than the standard RTS is also quite difficult as you need to inspire and provide for the humans, but also need to control them in some respects. But the game is very addictive and on your part you want to see the projects completed and do things to see them completed, but the multipliers aren’t as easy to complete as you think they are and can get quite frustrating as you try to use them to provide, but there is a real sense of accomplishment though when the projects are completed. And it is through such things that make me think of Godus as in that the humans create their own villages and building, and the same goes for this. And even when the humans decide to go to war, it is interesting to watch them do so. The world is beautifully animated, from the giants, to the humans, to even the plants and animals that live in the world and it is great to see so much diversity in the game, particularly from the animals themselves to the projects and if you are able to accomplish bigger ones, they lead onto even bigger ones. And if you are a game who likes accomplishments, there is an in-game accomplishment/trophy like system where in the lifespan of a single game you are able to accomplish a group of tasks you chose at the beginning of the game, that sense of accomplishment returns.

Reus Mountain Giant

REUS is an extraordinarily fun game. Addictive with a lot of replay value in a beautifully crafted, animated, colourful and even sounding world with lots to do and achieve while also trying to survive and do all of that within a predetermined amount of time with lots to unlock too, it is seriously good fun. Give it a try, I highly recommend this game (it’s both available on Steam and GOG.com, I have the GOG.com version).

GENEPOOL








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