The Cure – X-Men: The Last Stand

21 10 2015

X-Men: The Last Stand

What if there was a medicine out there that could cure something about you. Now I am not talking about flu or a cold, more something that you were born with. Imagine it, something that ailed you since birth could be eradicated and you could therefore do something that everyone else could. Just think, you could walk or see for the first time, or maybe even afflicted by something like what is covered in Scott Westerfeld’s book series Uglies (haven’t read it yet). If such a cure existed, would you take it?

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Released in 2006 by 20th Century Fox, Produced by Lauren Shuler Donner and Directed (this time) by Brett Ratner; X-Men: The Last Stand is the third film in the X-Men Film Series. Like in the previous films, the X-Men as well as other mutants are fighting for survival and freedom from a world that hates them. This time around though, all mutants are proposed a question; a question which if answered yes could mean an end to all persecution of mutants, and if answered no, could continue down the dark path to war. The question being, ‘do you want to be cured of your mutation?’

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Twenty years ago, Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) and Erik Lensher (Ian McKellan) go to meet a mutant by name of Jean Grey (Hayley Ramm), to try and invite her to come to their school. 10 years later, Wealthy industrialist Warren Worthington II (Michael Murphy) discovers his son is a mutant who is trying to cut feathers off his back. In the present day at Xavier’s School, Charles and Storm (Halle Berry) get a visit from Dr. Hank McCoy (Kelsey Grammer), a large mutant with blue skin and hair who is on the cabinet and is also a former student at the school. He comes to tell them that a ‘supposed’ cure for mutation has been created at Worthington Labs. An announcement is made at that moment regarding the cure, which Rogue (Anna Paquin) likes the sound of. At a private meeting of Mutants, Lensher (now known as Magneto) and his protégé Pyro (Aaron Stanford) gatecrash the talk to state that the ‘voluntary’ cure will eventually be used on mutants to wipe them out. A group of Mutants at the event take notice of this; one of them, Callisto (Dania Ramirez) who is super-fast and can locate other Mutants is asked by Magneto to find Mystique. At Worthington Labs on Alcatraz Island, Hank meets young mutant Jimmy (Cameron Bright) whose power is to suppress other mutants abilities, and is the source of the cure. With Callisto’s help, Magneto finds Mystique (Rebecca Romijn) and rescues her from her captors. He also releases two other prisoners, Multiple Man (Eric Dane) and Juggernaut (Vinnie Jones). Mystique however gets shot by a gun carrying weaponized cure cartridges, and loses her mutant traits, and therefore gets abandoned by Magneto for no longer being a mutant.

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At Worthington Labs, the cure goes public, but Worthington II wants to start with his Son; Warren Worthington III (Ben Foster). Warren III breaks free from his restraints and shows off his resplendent angelic like wings and tells his father, that it’s what he alone wants, before flying away. Scott (James Marsden) who is still distraught at the loss of Jean (Famke Janssen) leaves the mansion and heads for Alkali Lake where she died, and finds that she has been resurrected. They embrace, but something happens to him, that Charles senses. Storm and Logan (Hugh Jackman) go to the lake, find Scott’s glasses and the body of Jean. At the Mansion, Xavier reveals to Logan that as a young girl something destructive manifested inside Jean calling itself The Phoenix and that he psychically blocked it out. Charles tries to block it out again while Logan questions his motives. Later when Jean wakes up however, Logan discovers that the Jean he once knew is not the one in front of him and realizes she killed Scott. She begs Logan to kill her, but then she knocks him out and heads for her childhood home. Charles goes to her home with Logan and Storm, only to be confronted by Magneto and his new team. Inside the house, Magneto tries to convince Jean that Charles wants to suppress her powers. Charles and Jean have a psychic confrontation in which Jean grows immensely powerful and results in Xavier being killed. Magneto takes Jean away while Logan and Storm breakdown at the loss of the professor.

Back at the school a funeral is held for the loss of Xavier, a loss that everyone at the school feels. Hank suggests that with Charles gone, the school should close down, but Storm decides to keep it open, remembering that Charles suggested that she take over when he was gone. During the night, Bobby Drake (Shawn Ashmore) tries to cheer up friend Kitty Pryde (Ellen Page) who can walk through walls, by taking her ice skating. Rogue however sees them, and seeing Kitty as a romantic rival leaves the mansion to get a cure shot. Bobby tries to stop her, meeting Pyro at a cure protest, who then destroys the cure building. Magneto deliverers a threat to the President (Josef Sommer) who along with secretary Trask (Bill Duke) decide to arm all soldiers with the weaponised cure to combat Magneto’s threat. Logan who still has feelings for Jean goes to Magneto’s camp to try and bring her back. He finds her but gets thrown out by Magneto. The President finds Magneto’s camp thanks to a now transformed Mystique, but it turns out to be a decoy. Logan returns to the school and assembles what X-Men he can; Bobby, Kitty, Beast, Storm and Colossus (Daniel Cudmore) and flies out to Alcatraz Island. Magneto who is already within easy reach of the island moves the entire Golden Gate Bridge so that he and his army of mutants can attack. The X-men shortly arrive after a small skirmish between Magneto and the soldiers.

Magneto sends in the main body of his army. Callisto and Storm engage in a fight which Storm later wins. Juggernaut; who is practically unstoppable, goes inside the labs to kill Jimmy. Kitty runs after him, reaching Jimmy first, but discovers her powers no longer work due to Jimmy’s powers. Using the information, she is able to trick Juggernaut to knock him out, and rescues Jimmy in the process. Inside the labs, Arclight (Omahyra), Psylocke (Mei Melançon) and Quill (or) Kid Omega (Ken Leung) find Worthington II and kill his assistant (Shohreh Aghdashloo). They try to throw him off the lab roof, but he is saved by his son who flies him to safety. Outside, Magneto tries to end the fight quickly. The X-Men decide to use the cure on Magneto. So while Bobby keeps Pyro busy, Colossus, Logan and Hank successfully inject the cure into Magneto, who loses his powers. The battle now won, Logan tells Jean that it’s all over, but then they are attacked by a squad of soldiers. Jean kills them by disintegration. Everyone else tries to escape except Logan who tries to confront her. While Jean disintegrates everything around her, Logan is able to survive due to his healing powers. When asked by Jean if he would die for them, Logan says he would really die for her. Logan then kills her when she asks him to save her. Back at the mansion, graves are constructed for Jean and Scott, and Storm is now headmistress. Rogue returns, having had the cure and can now touch Bobby without hurting him. Hank is appointed ambassador to the United Nations, while in a park somewhere; Magneto sits alone with a chess set. He holds out his hands towards a metal piece, which wobbles slightly.

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X-Men the Last Stand is a very enjoyable film; however it is a bit weak. I would not class this film as bad, in no way is it bad, it’s just a bit flawed. The film does struggle from several problems and I think has suffered from the loss of the series original Director. Ratner though produces something that is very enjoyable. I get the feeling however that instead of possibly getting involved, Like Bryan Singer did, he just sort of let the film get constructed and then joined in. It looks more like an action blockbuster, than the more thought-provoking approach that the previous 2 films did. The previous 2 were more about persecution and ones place in the world rather than what is offered here, which looks more mainstream, than sticking to its guns. One of the issues I find with this film is lack of main plot. Actually wait, I will re-word that. It has a main plot, in fact it has 2. One that is there for the most part and another which hogs some of the lime light. I can see that they tried to do more than one thing with this film, and because it tried to push stories on an equal footing, it’s hard to actually say what this film is about. As the film starts and talks about the cure for nearly half an hour, that part is solid and enjoyable, it’s going good. But the moment Jean is brought back in; there is no more mention of the cure, for a long time. Every time it becomes about Jean, it’s like that the cure, which is the main plot, suddenly isn’t. There is some sub plot in this such as the relationship and problems between Rogue, Kitty and Bobby, among others, but why they couldn’t either restrict Jeans re-birth to sub plot, or better yet, keep it out, and explore it in a later film possibly involving the Phoenix Saga. And that’s only the start of the film’s several issues. But first, some positive points.

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Last Stand, like its predecessors, has a strong cast. Characters have grown up and developed as the series has progressed and in Last Stand we get to see some of them finally take centre stage. In X-Men 1, Storm was something of a supporting role with a few good words here and there, now she is one of the film’s main characters. Her look has changed with shorter more striking hair, and has grown a lot in confidence becoming someone who stands out more. Her role though grows bigger as she takes over from the professor, and while her old side comes out when talking to Logan about Jean, and in turn gets possibly a bit too serious about it, she doesn’t let herself become that. Instead she grows to be a brilliant character, one of the series finest, one of the most caring, and enjoyable. Logan meanwhile seems to have gotten over his past and is instead dealing with the repercussions of Jean’s death. His character has gone rather quiet I think. He still has his moments where he is just himself, acting the way he does, but because he no longer has that baggage, it feels like he is just there. This is not necessarily bad though, because his amount of on-screen time, plus moments looking for Jean and command in the final battle more than make up for his lack of depth (his final scene with Jean is really good). Charles Xavier on the other hand is still bringing plenty of power and understanding, and comes out a little more this time as he confronts Logan and lets his personal side out regarding what he did to Jean. He is still there to guide and support the film, and does it well. His final moments with Jean provide one of the film’s most powerful moments. A moment, which like Jean’s death in X2 is felt hard by everyone, not just in the film, but those watching it too. It is a fantastic scene well worth watching, but you may feel rather sad afterwards, as one of the series best characters meets his unfortunate end. Jimmy also provides some nice insights into the Mutant world, but could have caused some controversy as he is kept in a white, one small window cell. His accommodation therefore could have caused more political struggle in the film. His scenes with Kitty during the final battle though provide a good situation to spice it up a little. Not forgetting other mutant appearances too like the confrontation between Logan and Marrow/Spike (Lance Gibson) at Magneto’s camp, a really good fight scene, plus the possible appearance of Deadpool (I have discovered that it’s actually Glob Herman), in a character (Clayton Dean Watmough) who keeps growing back his own limbs. Magneto meanwhile is just as sinister as he always has and while took a back seat as main antagonist in X2, he is back to lead the characters to war, becoming the central villainous archetype for this film. I do however think that due to this being something of a trilogy/series, there could have been possibly another villain. Not just Magneto or politics against mutants, but maybe something along the lines of Mister Sinister perhaps, as the genetic side of the film’s plot would greatly support his inclusion.

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The main new feature in the films cast though has to be Kelsey Grammer as Beast. Beast, much like Nightcrawler is an interesting character which due to his appearance carries a lot of character weight and understanding. While most mutants can simply blend into the background, a character such as Beast cannot. Beast however is not just some Monster; he is in fact a genius and a very well-spoken man. His position within the cabinet garners a lot of respect as well as potential animosity to others on it. He is though not afraid to speak his opinions and has a lot of understanding for both sides of the coin, and will not rush to make too big an opinion on a matter without thorough research. Alongside this though, he is still an animal, sort of like Jekyll and Hyde in one person instead of alter egos and proves himself as a worthy fighter, but like who he is inside, he is more of a diplomat than a fighter. To play such a role really does require an actor who can provide it, someone with a wealth of experience and cannot just look the part, but also voice it. Kelsey Grammer does this expertly and is one of the series best castings.

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The cast of characters isn’t without faults, and there are a lot of these. The Big one for me is the part of Warren Worthington III, also known as either Angel or Archangel (whichever you prefer). I really like this character; I have said many times over for several years that Angel is the most beautiful character in that he is the most simple. People dream of flight, and he does this through two angelic wings. On the surface he is such a pure, simple character to understand, and to begin with that’s all you need, there is no need for explanation as to what he can do. In Last Stand however there seems to be a generic lack of him. He is there from the start and is one of the instigators of the films (original) main plot. Without that beginning, we wouldn’t have the cure story. But if he’s there as an instigator, why isn’t he more of a central figure. He only has 6 scenes in the film, and only 3 of them involve vocals. It’s not like he is ignored either, as he continues to appear at moments which help cause decisions, but still, he is not a more major cast member, even though film posters and DVD’s would suggest otherwise. He is shown on the DVD covers, and I think the discs themselves. He is in posters for the film, and pictures of the film series up to this point, suggesting him being a central character. There’s even shots of him wearing an X-Men Leather Uniform, but not once in this film, does he wear one. Were they trying to make him a central character, but just couldn’t do it? Ok, the film is not as long as the previous 2, by about 30 minutes, in which there could have been more appearances for Angel if they had it going for longer, plus other characters too. I just find it a complete mystery. When I heard that he was going to be in this film, I was so happy. He appears in 2 of the best episodes of X-Men: Evolution, and has a place in the comics as a lead character, but despite this push and even showing things that don’t actually happen, he is still somehow here. I am not saying he should be removed from the film, more that, there should be more of him, and for good reasoning. He is a central emotional character which leads to the creation of the cure, and representation of his father’s (who is also played rather well) selfishness and possible disgust to mutants. The moment he is almost given the cure is one of the film’s best dramatic moments and is a fantastic scene. His earlier scene causing self-harm is also a brilliant short scene too. It’s just a shame that there’s not more of him.

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Magneto’s team of Mutants also have issues. No problem with Mystique. Mystique who produced such eye striking scenes in the first film, made a lot of sense in becoming the first victim of the cure, as that scene in itself shows the extent of what it does. However, Pyro is sort of held back until the end, Psylocke, who while having very few lines to speak, is held back and is far more interesting than the others in the group. Quill I find rather annoying as he is just there and doesn’t do much, the same going for Arclight, and Callisto is using someone else’s powers. Callisto is played brilliantly and character traits similar to those in the comics and other media are present including the animosity towards Storm plus attitude; she somehow though has the abilities of both Quicksilver and Caliban. Now while I don’t know all that much about Callisto, I can easily spot that one of Caliban’s abilities is there as well, like there was already too many mutants, no room for an extra one. Multiple Man is recruited, but only used once. Jean, while it is good to have her back, just seems unnecessary as her secondary main plot just slows down the film. She has her moments and the scene where she kills the professor and the one with Logan at the end are really good, it just feels like she is not carrying much of a part. The younger Jean scene though is really good but I think her final moment with Logan just felt like a way to prolong the film by another 4 minutes. It’s like they are trying to copy how they ended X2. The scene did not need to happen, the battle was enough, and it’s just there because it is. I will say however that the scene is done well, so while I find that it is un-needed, it is done well enough to be enjoyed. Why is Vinnie Jones in this film?! I like Juggernaut; an aggressive, angry, unstoppable character, his part in the series if done well, could be magnificent. Instead though we are given a character that is a wise cracking object, something that Juggernaut, in past experience isn’t. His costume looks rather ridiculous, and I think Vinnie Jones was only really cast for his size. Where is the aggression, the anger? Where is The Juggernaut? I will say though his scenes in the lab with Kitty are actually quite fun including his line when stuck in the ground.

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It’s not Just Magneto’s bunch either. While the President is played rather well, I feel like Trask is under used. A character that is supposedly named after the creator of the Sentinels and is played rather well too is like others, under used, he just isn’t there at moments when he could be. There’s no subplot either to suggest if he is going to create the sentinels or not. Then we come to Xavier’s School. Colossus, who has more of a part in this film than in X2, has less of a role. He is there to be another character and has at most, 2 lines if not just 1. It’s great to have him in the final battle and in the Danger Room scene, but it feels like he had more of a part in number 2, even if he was on-screen in two scene for less than 5 minutes overall. I am disappointed in Rogue’s part of this film. She starts in X1 as a sort of narrator, now she is just some romantic interest. She could have had more of a physical role and been a surprise appearance/hero during the final battle. It should be more that she learns to deal and live as herself than take the coward’s way out. She forms something of a romantic triangle between Bobby and Kitty. Rogue sees Kitty as a threat, and more likely goes to get the cure, just to secure Bobby for herself. Bobby does not see this though. Bobby does continue to produce good scenes and his character really develops into the Iceman of the comics, including Ice like skin. But he is mostly subjected into being this extra for a sub plot trying to become another main plot. Kitty finally gets an appearance in the series, and has some good scenes including the main battle and with Jimmy, but because of the sub plot is sort of under used. She is played fantastically by Ellen Page; it’s just this additional sub plot sort of holds the characters down. What should have been included is confrontations between Rogue and Kitty, possibly even Rogue watching Kitty and Bobby right next to the ice causing a confrontation. Rogue could have then struggled with her conscience before making a surprise appearance in the final battle, and then Kitty could have grown more towards Colossus as the end of the film approached. Something like that would have improved it greatly and would be a start as to where to direct the characters in later films.

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While there are several negatives, the film does have several positives. For one, it’s use of Special Effects. The film makes great use of big and small effects from the flying of Angel, the hot piercing of Callisto after being shocked by Storm, Mutant Powers, Set pieces, the suits and costumes, and many more. But the big one of course is the movement of the Golden Gate Bridge. I remember how amazed I was by that scene when I first saw it; it’s a scene which still provides that appeal. When the film first came out, it was one of the best pieces of Special Effects to date. While crisper effects have come about since, the scene is still superb and amazing to watch.

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Alongside the special effects, we also have yet another brilliant soundtrack (composed by John Powell). The film carries two main themes. One for the opening credits and the other which is used mostly for the end credits, but has its other moments. Last Stand’s opening credits, while not using the brilliant theme from X2, is nonetheless superb. The animation that goes with it is pulse pounding, exhilarating, and heart stopping stuff. I find myself watching the opening titles over and over again to listen to the soundtrack and watch the brilliant animation and video provided. More recently I have even begun to act like I am a conductor conducting the orchestra playing the piece; you can really get into it.

Other pieces of soundtrack range from the glorious sound of Angel flying through the air, Magneto moving the bridge, Charles’s funeral. Charles confrontation with Jean, as well as Logan’s, both of which are very powerful scenes and need a soundtrack to make them so. It’s a soundtrack that works. It provides a serious note as well as moments of wonder, plus moments of emotion and drama too. It is a soundtrack that really stands out, and while the film may be weak, the soundtrack definitely isn’t (and if you listen carefully sounds like the lyrics for that earthquake song hidden in the tune, or at least I think I can hear it).

X-Men: The Last Stand is an enjoyable film, no doubt about it. I like this film and some of the characters, scenes, SFX, soundtrack and some of its story. But it is a weak one. Out of the 7 films in the series, I would put this in 6th position. It just does not offer what the top 5 do that makes them stand out as really good films. Yes you have got a strong storyline in the Mutant Cure, but then you have 1 or 2 other plots which slow this down and make you forget about it. It’s like, at one point you are talking about the mutant cure, and then a second later you are going “what was I talking about?” The films cast I find are rather under used and in many cases are un-needed. You have other characters that have potential but are forgotten about. This film has a lot of potential, but is under used, and when trying to figure what it’s about, you can’t. The film though does provide enough to be worth watching. It’s a good fun film with plenty of things to enjoy and while it may be toned down in comparison to its 2 predecessors, it still provides those kinds of moments. Plus, it’s 10 times (if not more) better than what comes next.

GENEPOOL

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They Were Trying To Kill It (Part 2) – Godzilla 2014

2 07 2014

Godzilla 2014

Following on from last week of my review of what is at the moment The Best Film this year, which by all counts is going to be hard to beat, at least to me, but the previous post looked at the human side story of the film, cast and soundtrack, but really this is the big one as I will be looking at the BIG G himself. From special effects to both Godzilla and his new companions to comparisons in story with another monster movie series as well as how this new film compares in not too much detail with the original monster and also why I think it is not just the best film this year, but one of the best film’s in the series, and that comes with evidence.

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The film’s special effects are really well done, and I mean really well done at that. The film’s producers have obviously taken great time and effort into not just making Godzilla look like, well himself for a start, but also both believable and naturalistic as in the viewer being able to see what is in front of their very eyes and believe that the creature could exist, like your eyes do not deceive what you are seeing. But the detail is also in the close up. For several parts of this film, Godzilla is seen to be in the state of minimalistic. So you may not see his entire shape or size for the most part, but even those scenes show a level of detail that is perhaps not as explored. I mean these are giant monsters, obviously and the film takes the standing point of the viewer on the ground, the human element, seeing it through their eyes. So you naturally jolt your head back to look up at them, but because of their size and depending on how far away you are from them, you may not see all of them, but when you are close up the little details are not forgotten, they are included. Godzilla’s hands on the Golden Gate Bridge (anyone else notice that it’s not the first time the same bridge has been attacked by a Giant Monster in less than a year?), close up details of the MUTO’s when on the ground and really close for comfort, Godzilla’s irradiated damaged flesh, and the detail in the shape, form and material of all three monsters from head to toe. Not only does all of this exist, and in such great detail, but it is also terrifying; and if the special effects achieve such a thing on something that (as far as we know) does not exist, then the effect has been achieved.

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The monsters themselves have been beautifully crafted, but there is more to a monster than just what meets the eye to which the filmmakers and the audience have an unfair advantage over the people in the film who are too busy running away. The Muto’s are the newest edition of a long line of monsters to tangle with the king, so let’s start with them. The Muto’s are nicely well designed and have essences of real life animals in them presenting themselves as creatures that are definitely of the world and not from space. I do like how there are major differences between the two. The male is smaller and can fly and whose body structure makes him look like a praying mantis on the ground and a bat in the air. Whilst the female is much larger and while exhibiting the same mantis like look, has more in common I would say with a spider as in she is reliant on walking and so perhaps needs to walk as such. They of course share the same features in the face and the look of the MUTO’s is nicely made to make them look sinister. During the night shots this works to their advantage and when the let out the under voice almost clucking, it sounds like a measurement of laughter but it could just be more the sound of the wind passing through their immense bodies. Little things such as the facial features really help to cement their positions as the real villains of the film. this idea also is used to great effect by having them the first monster that truly gets revealed. TO begin with you believe that Godzilla is the one responsible for the attack on the power plant, so far he’s the only creature been mentioned, but by revealing that it was actually the MUTO’s not Godzilla, it adds that emotional connection and presents them as the actual ones to do the damage and as such become the villain and it means that you as an audience member want and need a hero, and it cements Godzilla’s role in the film from the moment he is fully seen for the first time, to the point that he leaves. It is interesting use of both perception and suggestion from the film makers that gives a very big surprise early on and one that hooks you as you wonder, If that is a MUTO, what is Godzilla?

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The thing is though, look and sound and abilities are not enough and the thing that makes the monsters in a Godzilla film stand out is personality. Godzilla as a monster and as a series has survived on several key structures and points but one of those core elements is personality of the monsters themselves. If you look at other past American Monster Movies, they have all been referred to as “it” or “the”, they are all things. But if you give something a name, its presence means a whole lot more. You could just call your family pet (if you have one) “the cat” or “the dog” but you give it a name and refer to it by name and as such it feels more like a friend and part of the family and as such you discover the pet’s personality. The same is true for Monsters. By referring to Godzilla by it or the, it could be any one of a number of things but because of the description, it requires an explanation every time it is talked about. But now that you have labelled him, given him right to a personality, you just need to say the name, and people know who he is. For the MUTO’s it really is more of an it or a thing as MUTO is technically a designation for Massive Unidentified Terrestrial Organism. While the word does sort of become a name as the film goes on, they are still these things and even though they show signs of care towards each other and their young as well as a level of passion, they are just still designated creatures or animal. So while they definitely have a level of passion and character for such well-designed and thought out animals, they are unable to come out of their shell fully due to their possibility for personality restricted, which is a general shame because I really liked them.

Godzilla on the other hand actually looks like Godzilla (something that did not work out at all 16 years ago). Great care and attention has been taken to make him look like the monster we all know and love, but also to have his own spin so that he is not too much like his Japanese self and so this look can be more independent as well and as such does not need to rely on those films and allows this film to work on its own merits. So his size in this film (the biggest to date, and possibly a bit fat) belongs to this film, but attributes such as his scales, dorsal spines, head and tail are like that of the original Japanese monster. One such item is easier to see also now thanks to the film’s point of view and that is of Godzilla’s broken skin which is supposedly caused by the damage done to him by nuclear weapons testing. This goes to show that Godzilla is invincible to man’s most powerful weapons and supports the idea of him being the force of nature and as such unstoppable, but shows a more human element too showing that he still has those scars from long ago battles which on top of that could be emotional ones too but decides to wear them than think about them. His overall look particularly in the facial features when he is first revealed in the Hawaii airport scene makes me think of dragons. You get a brief second or two to look at his face, you get this overall feeling of terror like you are looking at a destroyer, a creature of such great magnitude and ferocity and while his features make him look like a cross between a dog and a lion, the essence of the dragon like nature is there and this helps with the tales of myths and folklore that surround him, and from this he isn’t just a monster, he feels and looks like a dragon too, and this gets your heart racing.

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But while the look of him is amazing and is true to the Japanese Monster, there are more new editions to the creature but these are more in what he does than what he looks like. But at least one of the things he does isn’t new and has been with him since 1954, any guesses as to what they would be? You got it, his Atomic Deathray. Yes, we were promised a Godzilla true to the Japanese monster and a monster that all we wanted to see but come the final fight I was lost wondering where the Deathray was. Everything was perfect but no sign of that. But then, in the darkness, a shadow grew with a long blue light drawing upwards, I was on the edge of my seat, hoping it was what I thought it was going to be, and then, when his Atomic Breath blasted across the screen, I was so happy, I jumped forward (sort of, more like leaned, not much of that can be done in a cinema seat) and thrust my arms and fists forward and down in a hammer like motion in a gesture of celebration. It was great. It’s not that it’s just there, but the characterization of Godzilla with the power rising up through his scales and then also being the right colour meant that I was so happy and the scene was amazing. I really did enjoy the use of the dorsal spines like shark fins as even after the reveal in Hawaii, it meant that Godzilla still had some screen time but in order to keep something’s under wraps, he could keep that mystery about him but also have that extra element of something huge is coming, and it’s sightings in the water have their own power behind them being seen as you know something big is about to happen. The new roar is really good; it really helps to give this new film its own sense of credit, especially to Godzilla himself. Instead of doing what Emmerich did 16 years ago by taking the classic roar and just extending it, the filmmakers here have created their own unique sound. The sound he produces is still very much like how a Giant creature would, it shakes the ground and produces a lot of noise thanks to the huge inner spaces within its own vocal chords and while it kind of makes me think of perhaps an elephant or other large mammals instead of reptiles (which can’t actually roar)and is overall very well produced to make an absolutely great sound.

Godzilla’s personality exists brilliantly in this film but his characterization which adds to this is different in many respects to what he was when he first started but these changes are not a bad thing in any way, shape or form. Godzilla is made out to look like a super predator, the alpha male top dog of the natural world. This is presented with the idea that should a creature like the MUTO’s arise, therefore threatening his turf, the predator comes out to play to reassert his dominance over the natural world. This idea may sound a bit corny in that sense, but it is a great way of bringing Godzilla into the story in a way that actually makes sense. This animal like approach helps him to fit more easily in the position of him still being a creature of nature even if he is definitely more than that. This comes even more into the fray come the battle sequences where; when rises out of the water his body movements represent that of something which is more gorilla like. While he fights and acts more like an animal now or at least something that is believable to the natural world, attention has been made to how such a creature could fight if say a giant lizard could stand on two legs, had a big tail, big head (Atomic Deathray) and large arms. But making him like the world is not the same as placing him in it. While it has been stated that his build up to appearance is like that of Jaws with the Dorsal fins in shot and no major reveal for a while, this idea does work splendidly, so while you can see him, you still have no idea what he looks like. Much like the original 1954 film as described by Enthusiast Tony Luke for a BBC Documentary in 1998 said “As the film progresses over the next hour, you just get hints of something big and dark and evil smashing its way through northern japan”. Now while the creature in this film is not like that in characterization, he is like that in the sense that you know something is coming, but even when it is first spotted, you don’t know what it is, and can only see a small portion of it. Another form of characterization and personality was thanks to the opening screen credits. Now while the 1998 film did something partially similar, this time around, it was very clever how they pulled it off. There was still the connotation with the use of Nuclear Weapons, the extra points of A) seeing Godzilla to begin with if only in his submerged form meant that he is at least mentioned from the start along with that great soundtrack, and B) the relation with sea tales of Giant Sea Monsters including sightings of sea serpents and the Kraken which represents his connection to the sea and world but also shows his connection to mother nature herself for always being there when he is needed to be. This use of old folklore tales is very well done and a nice technique by the filmmakers.

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While the use of him being an alpha predator is well done, in story terms, I feel like I have seen this before, in another monster movie starring another Japanese cultural icon; Gamera. Last year, I reviewed Gamera: Guardian of the Universe. The first in the Gamera Heisei Trilogy. Now for those un-aware, Gamera is another giant movie monster, but taking on the guise of a fire breathing, rocket-propelled flying turtle. Gamera first appeared in Japanese Cinema in 1965 and thanks to a growing popularity which particularly after the Heisei series has gone on to become an icon himself (please refer to my What is Gamera post). In Guardian of the Universe (rephrased to GGOTU) an ancient species of bird comes to life and wreaks havoc in Japan (like all other monsters do) only for them to suddenly have to deal with the appearance of a Giant Turtle. The two then fight with Gamera acting like the superior creature being sent out to take care of the appearance of a new threat. While a brilliant film, I can’t help but feel that the same story structure has been applied to Godzilla. Big creature comes out of the woodwork, bigger creature comes to deal with it, they fight, bigger one wins. I am not saying this is necessarily a bad thing but I do feel that it is sort of weird that this new film has been almost based on the story from and even the characterization of the lead monster (and even some of the design of the MUTO’s look a bit like Gyaos) comes from the series biggest competition.  Mean Gamera himself in that film is an ancient creature created by a lost civilization, much like Godzilla’s ancient history. This is more of something that you may need to make your own minds upon. If you have not seen the Gamera Heisei Trilogy, I do highly recommend it (particularly the last one). But for those who have already seen GGOTU, what do you think?

GGOTU3 (The film is not in Black and White, it's just that this is a Good Picture)

As for the main part of the story itself, there is a lot of talk in it about the want and urge of man to control nature. After going to see this a second time with a friend, she mentioned that it is a lot like Jurassic Park which does use a lot of the same elements. I myself recently read the book by Michael Crichton which shows an urgent need to control nature as well as the refusal to admit when you are wrong and the ignorance of man who just wants to continue. This film uses ideas like that a lot of the time but does show the learning side as come the end, at least for now there is no real want to control Godzilla. But knowing how the American Military is usually portrayed in films, I bet there could be the possibility of them wanting to find some means of control over Godzilla in future films. Also on the nature note there is also the amazement and sense of discovery that occurs when something amazing has been discovered and shows that while we do live on this planet there is still a whole lot more that we don’t know about and perhaps our strive to find it and control it could lead to the end. I do find myself thinking a lot about Blake Snyder’s book; Save the Cat!: The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need, which talks about how films are written to connect with the audience through the use of primal urges, and one of those early settings is described by Snyder as “Monster In The House” to which he further describes by stating that “It’s not about being dumb, it’s about being primal. And everyone understands the simple, primal commandment: Don’t… Get… Eaten!”. This is very much true with this film as the point of view of the audience is that of the people on the ground during the events and the urge to survive the power of the super predators. Much like a Japanese Godzilla film as well, there is a lot of mentions about the use of Nuclear weapons, from the beginning to the end and I particularly enjoyed the scene between Stenz and Serizawa when Serizawa shows him his watch which stopped on the day of the Hiroshima Bomb. It showed a sense of understanding from Stenz about the use of nuclear weapons as well as a possible sign of regret showing that the world has moved on and understand such power more and don’t take things so lightly, but connected with that is the lesson of not being able to control nature too and the understanding that comes with that. And much like how stories in cinema work with the characters having to grow and change, the same is applied here while also showing the growth in the human mind over the last 60 or so years with mentions to Nuclear dominance being one of them.

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I absolutely love this film from the ground up. It gives a well-deserved new light onto a character whose reputation was dented back in 1998 and corrects everything that the said film did wrong. It respects the design and meaning of a character that has been on-screen for about 60 years now and is beloved by millions of people all around the world. Using a great amount of new expertise in film making including special effects, lighting, shooting and even a soundtrack of extremely high qualities and added to that a film’s cast who each have their own loveable quirks and then Monsters whose design and characterization is of such a high standard, all coming together to make one fantastic film, a film that I have fallen in love with from start to finish. This is the film that I have been waiting to see and while it may have taken somewhere between 4 to potentially 10 years to produce, in the end it was worth waiting for and the confirmation of a sequel just means there is more to look forward to. In part 1 I said that this film is one of the Best films in the series, a comment I stand by, and while it is not my favourite, I do believe that the quality of this film really does make it so. And one other thing on that. A couple of days after seeing this film for the first time, I watched one of the all-time classic best films in the series; Ghidorah, the Three Headed Monster, one of the ones I like a lot, and I did not enjoy it as much as this one. So while its place in the film series and general cinema is still probably going to be debated; if it is able to make a Godzilla fan as big as me happy and not disappointed, it has succeeded. And that is why I love this film, and shouldn’t that be the ultimate goal of films? To Be Enjoyable. Thank You Godzilla.

GENEPOOL








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