The Entire World Is Waiting For The Power Of Steam – Steamboy

16 11 2016

Steamboy (Sunrise - 2004)

In 2013, animation Director and co-founder of Studio Ghibli; Hayao Miyazaki created a film which he announced was going to be the last before he retired. The film was called The Wind Rises, and it was a film that followed a young man who dreamt of designing the ultimate aircraft, and so the story took us on a history of his young life, career, romantic relation, and a retrospective history of his country, eventually leading the young man to his pivotal moment designing the aircraft of his dreams. There is one slight issue however with the company he works for, being the ones to foot the bills; the only option is to design it to the benefit of a company contract, and at that time in Japan’s history the only contract work for airplane manufacturers (or at least those shown in the film) is to build them for the sake of war. So while the young man does get to design his dream plane, he has to come to the eventual realization of what the plane’s purpose is to be. It is a very interesting idea for a story, looking at great inventors, the things they do; but also what they have to do in order for them to be allowed to build such things!

The Wind Rises (Studio Ghibli - 2013)

Released in 2004 by Toho, produced by Sunrise and Directed by Katsuhiro Otomo; Steamboy is a Steampunk animated action film set in the UK and follows the adventure of a young inventor who has to come to terms with the realities of the world of inventions and of course save the day from threats very close to home. Touted at the time of release as being the most expensive Japanese animated film of all time, Steamboy took 10 years to produce, and is only the second major animated release for Otomo following his milestone film Akira in 1988.

Akira (Toho 1988)

In 1863 in Russian Alaska, inventor Lloyd Steam (Patrick Stewart) and his son Eddie (Alfred Molina) have discovered a pure mineral water, which they believe they can turn into a powerful steam based energy source. During an experiment however, everything goes wrong with Eddie being engulfed in freezing gases, but leaves a strange spherical object being created. Three years later, in Manchester England, great-grandson of Lloyd: Ray Steam (Anna Paquin), a young inventing prodigy receives a strange parcel containing the spherical object plus some designs relating to it. Two men then show up called Alfred (Mark Bramhall) and Jason (David S. Lee) claiming to be from something called the Foundation and who want the ball. Ray refuses to give it to them, and is surprised to see the arrival of his grandfather. Ray makes a run for it, and is eventually chased by a strange steam automotive vehicle, making his escape on his own Monocycle. The chase leads them onto the railway tracks, with the automotive being pushed into a river, and Ray being rescued by Robert Stephenson (Oliver Cotton) and his assistant David (Robin Atkin Downes). Things don’t last long however, as while the train is en route to London, Ray is kidnapped by the Foundation thanks to their Zeppelin.

Ray finds himself in a dining hall, and being introduced to members of the O’Hara Foundation which includes Scarlett O’Hara (Kari Wahlgren), the spoiled granddaughter of the foundation’s chairman, and Archibald Simon (Rick Zieff), a company executive. Ray then meets his father Eddie whose head has been greatly altered by the accident, now with only a few strands of hair and a helmet covering one half of his head, as well as other metal components all along his body. Ray and Scarlett are taken on a tour of the facility dubbed The Steam Castle by Eddie who says he wants to use it to enlighten mankind’s vision of science. Ray is recruited by his father to help finish it off, but when asked to help in assisting to turn off a valve, Ray finds his Grandfather trying to sabotage the whole thing. He tells Ray that the purpose of the castle and the O’Hara’s foundation is to sell weapons to Britain’s enemies at the Great Exhibition the following day and shows Ray evidence of this. The two eventually reach the core of the castle, and pry away a steam ball, one of three used to power the castle, but they are then surrounded. Ray makes an escape but Lloyd is recaptured. Ray manages to run into Robert Stephenson telling him about his father and the steam castle, and hands him the Ball thinking Stephenson can be trusted, but discovers that Stephenson’s motives are near the same; to build an army for the purpose of keeping Britain Great.

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At the Great Exhibition, the O’Hara foundation shows off their weapons to generals from around the world, exhibiting their steam-powered soldiers, miniature aircraft and submersible men. At this moment, Stephenson launches an attack on the foundation using his steam battle tanks. With the exhibition now a war zone, Ray steals the ball back from David, and rigs it up to use it as a sort of jet pack. In the foundation’s control room, Eddie, straps himself into the machine and while under powered orders for the castle to launch. The building sheds its skin to show a great behemoth like structure, a big black floating castle, which then engulfs the city of London in a big freeze. The royal navy in vain try to shoot it down, while Stephenson attempts to pull it down with his trains. Ray manages to get on board the castle reuniting with his father and Scarlett, but is too late to stop Lloyd from shooting Eddie. With Eddie having disappeared into the machine, Ray and Scarlett assist Lloyd in getting the castle back over the Thames as the machine is too unstable and likely to explode. At the last-minute, Eddie having deflected the bullet with his metal body decides to lend a hand, revealing Lloyd’s original intention for the Steam Castle: to be used as a giant theme park. Ordered by his family to save Scarlett and leave, Ray makes his way back to the control room, straps on a jet pack and leaves the castle just as it explodes, sparing most of London in the process.

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Can a film justify its release if it does not have much of a plot? Steamboy is an interesting film; on the one side it’s very well researched, and is somewhat surprising to see a Japanese animated film set in 19th century England and feature locations such as Manchester and (‘of course’) London, as well as feature great moments of a country’s history such as the Great Exhibition and famous faces like Railway Engineer Robert Stephenson. I am not saying this can’t be done, I am just saying how well and detailed it all is but you would not exactly expect for a film from Japan to be set in this country during that period. Of course, this film does also have big outstanding and unbelievable moments, interesting characters and great themes; much like you would expect from the man who made Akira: or should you? That’s the point though of seeing it isn’t it, or at least most might think so, that because this man-made an iconic film from the 1980’s, one of cinema’s all-time great animated films, that is why we should see it; no other reason right? This film is of course heavily touted for being from Katsuhiro Otomo, the same director of Akira; but is that the reason why we should see this film, or should it be that it’s a happy coincidence, and that this film should really be its own thing. I think that is where this film sort of collapses. There are some good things about this film: It does feature big moments of disbelief, and it features themes and ideas as well as argues the differences between progress and greed as well as the blessings of science, but only a little bit really, as all that gets entrenched in delivering the Akira experience, with big moments, wonders of awe and nothing else really. It has it’s moments, moments of philosophy that intrigue that inspire, and the story develops this a little bit; but possibly under the belief that he had to deliver a 19th century version of Akira rather than explore these ideas and create something that was its own identity, Otomo just sort of skipped all that. Don’t get me wrong, I really like Akira, I would just rather watch Akira rather than something that is not a near carbon copy of it (Force Awakens).

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The film’s characters are a real odd bunch and (international released version) are played by some top-notch quality actors. Much like what was stated above, some characters are minor-ly developed and are actually going in the right direction but are lost in what is a rather convoluted and unused plot. The issue that this film has with its characters is that it’s hard at any one point to actually know who is good and who is bad. Ray Steam is obviously the hero of the story, but it’s just obvious if somewhat boring. The character is nicely set up and has reason to explore and discover as he is lost without his heritage and is in a world that he would rather be doing something else in, but other than that there is no real reason for him. He tries to be brave and do the right thing, he is just not a decent enough character to really get behind or enjoy. Someone like Scarlett is a lot more interesting. She actually develops over the film’s timeline, going from a toffee nosed brat to a proper hero and someone worth rooting for. Yes she starts off in a situation where she is horrid and someone you have no affection for, but as the film develops she becomes a good character, so why she couldn’t be the protagonist is beyond me. That is the thing though with this film, there are two solid female characters, Scarlett and Emma (Paula J. Newman), but Emma gets 3 minutes of fame and is never seen again, but she was interesting compared to Ray who is just useless. The issues with good guy bad guy just continue throughout. Yes, the henchmen are bad, but that is their point and Archibald Simon on the other hand is just a pleasant annoyance who can’t stop talking. Robert Stephenson is nicely done, but it’s sad that someone who should be a sort of helper, a guide or assistance in times of such peril turns out just to be as horrid and bad as the somewhat…..Supposed to be…..villains. His assistant David pretty much covers this role with ease, and it would have been more interesting if David per say was the villain out of the two and was something of a manipulator, and so Stephenson could then be the helper, with a villain by his side that needed defeating. Lloyd is of course a good guy but the story does the right thing of teasing his intentions and asking if he is bad or good, and then reveals his intentions correctly and stays that way, I just don’t think the mad professor look really does him any favours. Eddie meanwhile is of course the big bad villain and is voiced brilliantly, and much like Lloyd is teased into his role, but he just keeps changing his mind. His intentions and motives are there as to why he is who he is, but why would the villain suddenly change sides like that at the end. He should be a boss to fight, a hindrance to overcome, not someone who is like: “Oh well, let me give you a hand!”

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The voice acting works in some of the film’s favour, and boasts acting talent like Patrick Stewart, Anna Paquin and Alfred Molina, but it’s not fully utilised I feel. Scarlett is voiced nicely and actually sounds and feels real, compared to Anna Paquin whom does a good job in a male voice role, but in the form of the voice that most people believe how British people speak. Speaking as a British person, I do not speak like that, I have actually yet to meet someone who does. Both Alfred Molina and Patrick Stewart are British; and they don’t speak like that; and they’re in this film! It becomes near offensive the more it gets touted. Maybe instead of hiring people to create a generic voice that does not actually exist, maybe they should hire British actors to do the job, because then it would be a lot more realistic (and less offensive). When it comes to the voice overs in this film the only ones that really do anything I feel are those of Patrick Stewart and Alfred Molina. Patrick Stewart’s character is not seen much of to truly enjoy, but it’s still good when he is on-screen, although possibly a bit loopy and mad. Alfred Molina though I feel really carries this film. It’s a voice of reason and passion, and although the character struggles to really find his place in this film, the voice over does the character tremendous and enjoyable levels of entertainment and justice. It’s just a shame about everyone else really.

The film does have its recovery sections, it’s not all collapsing. The animation is nicely done and works well to really capture the beauty and spectacle of 19th century England, especially London. The fleet of vessels on the Thames, the beauty of the city’s iconic buildings and structures, to the animated engineering of its own infrastructure. Add to this the machines and contraptions of the story’s fictional contents like the steam-powered soldiers, the monocycle, and of course the mighty Steam Castle in all its forms and you have this well-made world which has added benefits. I do think the animation style and colouring loses a bit in comparison to the film’s contemporise like the recent works of Studio Ghibli for example, but when close up the details are superb. The film’s soundtrack Composed by Steve Jablonsky) is an additional benefit too as it creates mostly sounds and ambiance rather than pieces of music. The music does have its moments of grandeur like the launch of the steam castle or the chase within, to moments of peace too like Ray’s theme, Scarlett’s theme, and of course the music behind the blessings of science monologue. Now while not insinuated within the soundtrack itself, there is one piece of music though that does come out in relation to the film: That of its theme from the trailer: Full Force; the adventure and steam-driven music that creates and encapsulates moments of awe and wonder, but creates a level of seriousness and tension to shine out loudly.  Although the film does tout some of that wonderful adventure but still steam punk driven piece of music here or there, it’s this piece of music which shines out for the film’s soundtrack, even though it is really non-existent, but it’s iconic and memorable enough for you to remember it in conjunction with this film.

Generally it feels like something of a shame altogether, because I was expecting more. Steamboy has its likable moments and bits to enjoy, but the story is so convoluted and makes more room for big moments rather than a properly developed plot. It’s one of those occasions where the trailer delivers more than the film. Steamboy is something of a quick storyteller; it just dashes from one thing to another, not developing nor explaining, creating interesting moments but not diving into them sacrificing its potential in the process for something else, but no reveal as to what. It comes with great voice talent but does not really use it effectively, it has interesting characters in the wrong roles and it has spectacular ideas that are just ignored. On the plus side the animation is delightfully detailed, and has music that has its occasions which are used well. Yes it has its big moments which are nicely done and very creative, but a film like this should be more than that. It should not be living in the shadow of its legendary predecessor and working hard to live up to be like its bigger brother. It should be blossoming like a flower, being independent and making its own path, then and only then can it have a chance to be on an equal footing and be appreciated the same way, rather than just being a clone in a different setting.

GENEPOOL





The Strain (Should Be) Back (Soon)

24 08 2016

The Strain

Over the last few months, I have steadily begun to grow weary of nearly everything on TV. Since about April for me it’s sort of been about recording and re-recording shows on Playback, of which many shows that I do indeed like, but have grown a little weary of as I watch them while doing stuff on the laptop and have only been able to truly appreciate them when I have a Nano-second to sit down and watch them on TV while doing nothing else. I have been trying to get back into other shows on my own like Arrow, while also watching the last episodes of Castle, re-watching old episodes of Rizzoli & Isles, trying to get more involved with the good but rather cheesy Quantico, The sometimes hard to find funny when doing something else Bob’s Burgers; the enduring but still relatively light Deadliest Catch, The odd repeat of The Bill, the yet to be watched Containment, and the thankful repeats of Rookie Blue. I have watched maybe 20 minutes’ worth of the new Top Gear, but that was 20 minutes too long in my opinion, while really enjoying the new Robot Wars which continues to deliver (at time of writing). There are some shows that gather my interest such as The Closer and Major Crimes which my Mam has been recording, but altogether, the current state of TV for me is pretty bleak and near boring. All I can really hold onto is that soon or later The Strain will be back.

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For those not in the know, The Strain is a TV Series based on the book trilogy of which the first book is named written by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan. The series (Produced by Carlton Cuse) is about a virus: a Vampire Virus. It brings vampires back to their roots as scary villains and not love icons. Basically, an ancient entity known as The Master (Robin Atkin Downes), has brought a curse upon the city of New York as he has willingly caused Vampires to return. Very quickly many people in New York have begun to turn into what are known as The Strigoi. Being vampires they can only come out at night, however, the Master has a group of major servants in the form of Eichhorst (Richard Sammel) and Eldritch Palmer (Jonathan Hyde) who work for him during the day to help push and instigate his plan, that being of eventual domination. In his way however are a group of vampire hunters led by Holocaust Survivor Abraham Setrakian (David Bradley), Scientists Ephraim Goodweather (Corey Stoll) and Nora Martinez (Mia Maestro), rat exterminator Fet (Kevin Durand) and computer hacker Dutch Velders (Ruta Gedmintas). That’s not all standing in The Master’s way however as he also has to contend with another batch of Hunters in the form of former convict Gus (Miguel Gomez), and his estranged half-vampire supposed son Mr. Quinlan (Rupert Penry-Jones). It is a losing battle however as more Strigoi are being turned and New York begins to fall further into darkness, aided further by Kelly Goodweather (Natalie Brown), Eph’s former wife, who has since been turned into a vampire herself and is busy stalking Eph and their son Zach (Max Charles).

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Now I wasn’t so sure about this program when I first heard about it (much like Blade: The Series), but I thought I would give it a go, I watched the Pilot and not only found it very riveting, but also rather terrifying and chilling. The first season pretty much just revolved around the initial spread of the Vampire Plague and the gathering of some heroes, while the second season went more into the public perspective as the plague gained more ground and became majorly noticeable, while the Master starts conceiving new ways to keep things going, whilst other characters begin to question their lives and place within this new world, and as such history and backgrounds of the events and characters begin to get more explored. Since then more characters have become more defined and brand new characters have been introduced. My favourite from pretty much the outset has been Dutch Velders, the group’s complete outsider, and whose character I have come to love and enjoy well.

Dutch Velders

Another character that has also begun to get traction is that of The Born. Better known as Mr. Quinlan, he is the missing link of the series as he is half vampire and possibly the son of the Master, and is out to kill him. His scenes so far have turned out to be rather fruitful and really enjoyable, and as given his position as become to stand out as something of the shows version of Blade, the hunter who is of himself of the species he is hunting, he also has a rather impressive voice.

I have no idea where the show is going to head next, but Series 3 is now on the horizon, having nearly waited a whole year with the Season 2 DVD yet to come out. I know this because I have been following the show’s progress, mostly from the accounts (on Twitter and Instagram) of Ruta Gedmintas. No idea what the show is going to involve other than the episode count going down from 13 to 10 annoyingly. Having not read the books, only reading a brief synopsis I can see some direction of its path, but as of yet, still no clue. Sorry to be so anti-climactic, but it’s true; however I am certain that it should be worth the wait, the show has done this to me once previously but has done more than just deliver, and so I am hopeful it will do so again. I am hopeful it will return within the next couple of months, and will in turn make TV exciting for me, at least for a little while and maybe a bit beyond that.

GENEPOOL (I am assuming and Hoping that it’s still going to be on Watch, even though it has since changed its name to W).





The Strain Is Back……….Sort Of

19 08 2015

The Strain (FX Productions - 2014)

Last September/October, a new TV series from FX began airing on UK channel Watch. The first episode was terrifying and scary but left an incredible impression on me. Through the next 12 Episodes I was gripped by the show’s setting, story, ideas and characters from start to finish. I just could not get enough, watching each episode when I could. But like many TV Shows, it had to end, but a Second Series was announced, so all I had to do was wait for the next series to begin. Well, nearly a year later, next week in fact; The Strain is back on TV……….sort of. The Second series has already begun showing in America, so it shouldn’t be too long until that is shown in the UK. Just over a week ago a trailer was aired on Watch saying that The Strain returns on the 26th August (when I am on holiday, but the series link record is already set up). When I looked however, it just appeared to be the pilot episode being shown, which probably means that they are going to show the first series again before the second series airs. Pity about that, but anyway you are probably wondering; “What is The Strain?”

Based on the book series of the same name by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan, The Strain is about a terrifying new virus which slowly builds to become one of the most deadly and contagious disease strains in the history of mankind. A strain that turns people into Vampires. These Vampires have one major physical difference however in a very long, muscular tongue which they use to suck out people’s blood, and possibly turn them into Vampires too. The series stars Corey Stoll as Dr. Ephraim ‘Eph’ Goodweather; a lead agent for the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), who after investigating a strange disease discovered on board a plane gets caught up in a plan to resurrect an ancient disease, one that could spell the end of all human life. In his attempts to prevent it, he is joined by CDC agents Dr. Nora Martinez (Mia Maestro) and Jim Kent (Sean Astin). Meanwhile, the attempts to resurrect this virus has not gone completely unnoticed, as pawn shop owner Professor Abraham Setrakian (David Bradley) has knowledge and history of this, and begins the fight to eradicate it as soon as possible. As the series goes on however, things get bad very quickly, and before you know it, Manhattan soon begins to turn ever more quickly into blood sucking Monsters, all led by the Mysterious Master (Robert Maillet and Robin Atkin Downes).

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As the series builds, more characters are introduced, such as Vasiliy Fet (Kevin Durand); a New York exterminator who begins to grow ever more suspicious about what is hiding in the sewers and Dutch Velders (Ruta Gedmintas); a computer hacker. Meanwhile, on the opposing side, there is Eldritch Palmer (Jonathan Hyde); a business tycoon who finances the operation to get the strain released, and Thomas Eichhorst (Richard Sammel), a former Nazi German Prison Camp officer who has a history with Setrakian, but is also The Master’s supposed number 2. And while all this is going on, there is an ex-con by the name of Gus (Miguel Gomez) who is soon beginning to realize there is more going on than what people are telling him.

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Since the first episode I have been hooked. I really do like this TV series. At the time it first came on I was watching Breaking Bad on DVD, but since this started, I turned my attention towards The Strain. I have been saying for years that my Favourite show on TV at the moment has been Rookie Blue (although my attention on that has gone more towards Castle this year), but right now I consider The Strain as the best TV show on at the moment. It is interesting, yet scary. It has really interesting characters (I particularly like the character of Dutch) and a story that just continues to open up and be explored as it continues. It has some terrifying moments and really scary creatures as well as a creepy but cool opening intro and theme from Ramin Djawadi.

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While the show has started airing its second series in the US, I take this as a note that the second series is not far from being shown in the UK. While I am a little annoyed that I still have to wait some time to watch the Second Season, I am still happy that I have the opportunity to watch the First Series all over again, starting with the Awesome Pilot Episode; Night Zero, Directed by Guillermo Del Toro himself. So, what are you waiting for? Turn on your sky box or whatever you watch TV on these days, set a record for The Strain on Watch beginning next week, watch the first series if you haven’t already and get set for the Magnificent return; of The Strain.

GENEPOOL








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