My New Video Games Console

1 03 2017

My PS3 (and GameCube)

From a very young age, I have enjoyed playing Video Games; it’s something I consider a strong hobby of mine and is something I like to do to enjoy and in more recent memory, to allow myself to mellow out after a hard time. I enjoy playing games by myself and with friends and family and over my lifetime I have played on a number of games consoles from the Sega Mega Drive, to the PlayStation 3; and have fond memories of playing games like RollerCoaster Tycoon and more recently Dishonored. I like video games but recently however, playing video games has been something of a struggle for me. The reason for this is that though while I still continue to enjoy them; currently I cannot really play anything that comes out as new as I am not really able to play them:

  • My Laptop is relatively under powered and can only play games with simple graphics.
  • I do have a more powerful PC, but it’s out of wireless signal range and I am unable to install anything onto it.
  • The GameCube is still working well, but nothing gets made for it anymore.
  • The Wii is ok, but right now is only worthwhile for playing with other people; not by myself.
  • The 3DS is fun, but there’s not really much out that I genuinely want to play on it.
  • The PS3 is able to play a lot of games, but as the console is now out of date, I cannot play anything new on it.

My gaming experience at the moment is still somewhat fun, but as new stuff comes out; without a valid platform to play on, I am getting ever more behind with releases and it is just getting me down.

dishonored-2

Fortunately though, I have been thinking a lot about this issue however. I have looked into a new PC, but realize that in terms of getting one it may be best to leave it. It will be a hard struggle, but it does allow me the opportunity to consider when one day I have the money to spend on a new machine, plus my own place to sort out how/where I would like one placing, I can then have a good go at building/buying a dream machine. In the meantime however, I have decided to buy a new home video games console. Something that I could own in which when new games are released that I want to play, I can just simply buy them and play them. Buying a new console is actually a rather fun experience, as the prospect of doing so simply gets me excited even when there are still a few days away before I actually get my hands on it. It’s like when someone on Gold Rush gets a new wash plant; these great big machines that get the gold out of the dirt, it’s a big moment, and right now, getting my new console, setting it up and playing on it; it’s like I am buying my own wash plant. But which Wash Plant should I buy though, that’s the real question?

There are several major home consoles on the market currently such as the Xbox One and the PS4. Choosing which one to buy is a hard process, as machines do cost quite a bit of money and as I don’t earn all that much at the moment, I need to be sure and positive that what I buy is definitely what I want right now. There is no reason why I could not have more than one, but like I said it costs money, and so right here and right now is what is more important, as if it comes to a time where I would like another to play on one, that bridge can be crossed when we come to it.

horizon-zero-dawn

Choosing which one was always going to be tricky, but I instantly knew that I did not want an Xbox. I have never really been a fan of it, I once thought about getting a Xbox 360, but as the PS3 had games on it that I wanted to play more than there were on the 360; I went with the PS3. The Xbox machine to me as always looked more like a glorified set-top box than a games console. I am buying the machine to play games on it, not to have access to other features which should not be the main feature of a video games console. This way of thinking though should not necessarily be the only reason to base your decision on. As a video games console is designed to play video games primarily (much like a wash plant is designed to retrieve gold, not necessarily to watch TV on it), you should make sure that the console is capable of playing the video games that you want to play. So choosing the PS4 over the Xbox One was a done deal as the PS4 has a list of games on it that include Horizon Zero Dawn and (eventually) Detroit: Become Human as well as other games I really want to play too like Dishonored 2. The Xbox One does not really carry anything that really jumps to my mind. So from reading that you must think I will soon be purchasing a brand new PS4 right? Wrong!

You see, those two are not the only major home consoles available for purchase right now. Back in October, another video game console was revealed to the public after over a year of speculation as to what it would be: the console formerly known as the NX was revealed by its creators Nintendo to be called the Switch. From the moment I first watched the trailer, I was really interested in the new console. I have been a fan of Nintendo for years, and have owned a few of their consoles, so a first reveal of a new console was always going to be exciting, but looking at some of the features of the Switch made it more of a contender than simply who was making it. One thing that I have grown tired of with other video games consoles is that of online multiplayer. My experience of online multiplayer has been harsh with very few fun memories. Some happy gaming memories do include Mario Kart Wii, Bomberman Blast, ModNation Racers and of course MAG, but overall my enjoyment of online console gaming has been mostly negative, even when playing games like Modern Warfare 2. What I do enjoy though is playing with family and friends, something which I have been able to do online on Steam with my brother, but also round a TV screen too having played games on the Wii. With a new home console; I would much rather prefer to play with family and friends round a TV screen, rather than play with anyone (not including family and friends), which has the potential to lead to a bad experience; although on the other hand could also lead to a positive experience. Given though that I knew what I wanted first and foremost, I went with that. The Switch spoke to me with its use of having one controller being split between two people, meaning that as soon as I get it, I don’t need to buy another controller, as I will already have one. Playing round a TV and not necessarily online can also lead to fond memories and experiences. I remember fondly playing Super Smash Bros. Brawl with a group of friends in Middlesbrough one December and really enjoying the player interaction as well as the fun of them being in the room, providing a core social interaction. Playing games online with just me in the room does not provide the same experience.

MAG Title

When it came to making the actual decision though, it really came down to games. I have pretty much been hanging around with this decision for a while with not being able to make a sound decision, until I realized that the Switch has more games on it that I want to play either soon or right now than on the PS3. While Horizon Zero Dawn was just about to be released, there was very much of anything else on the PS4 that I was actually desperate to play; the only one in question being Dishonored 2; while the Switch looks set to have a good range of games available soon, including some good-looking multiplayer in the form of Mario Kart 8 Deluxe at the end of April. Upon this realization, I made my choice, and within a couple of days I pre-ordered myself a Switch.

It’s a bit nerve-wracking ordering a new console when it has not been released yet, but also exciting too. I am really looking forward to getting my new Switch and trying it out. I don’t know what it’s going to be like or is going to do, but I am genuinely excited about getting a new games console. This does not necessarily prohibit me from getting a new PC or PS4 in the future; but it does mean that for now when something does gets released for the Switch I can at least play it and won’t have to worry about whether or not I will be able to play it or not. So like how a new Wash Plant works better at retrieving Gold, my new Switch I am sure will work well at providing me with lots of new and lasting enjoyment.

nintendo-switch

GENEPOOL (I may have gone overboard with the wash plant references).

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King Boom Boo

1 07 2015

King Boom Boo

Back in 2002 when I first received my GameCube, for the first couple of months I only had one game (Godzilla: Destroy All Monsters Melee). For the first few months to a year of ownership of the console I spent a lot of time in GAME and Gamestation looking at games to possibly purchase. One of the games I kept an eye on was a game I had played before on the Dreamcast which belonged to one of my brothers and was one of the first games he had for it. The game was Sonic Adventure 2 and was originally a game made exclusively for the Dreamcast. Sometime after the Dreamcast had stopped being produced however, Sonic Adventure 2 was re-released onto the GameCube as Sonic Adventure 2: Battle.

Sonic Adventure 2 (Sega - 2001)

When I first got Battle, I instantly began to play it and could easily recognise the levels I sometimes played on the Dreamcast, as well as later levels I remembered seeing my brother play. My progress on the game was slow, but I was a younger gamer at the time, (not as lightning fast like when I play now). While playing the hero side of the story, I knew about an upcoming boss level for Sonic where he goes up against this big Egyptian style statue called the Egg Golem. I remembered seeing my brother play that level, the one thing I did not see, was the boss level directly before it.

Hourglass

After completing one of Knuckles‘s treasure finding levels (one where I had to find keys to unlock a door in Eggman’s base), I expected to go up against the Egg Golem. Instead I was surprised to come to a sudden boss level involving a Giant Ghost. The boss was called King Boom Boo: The King of Ghosts and he was a hard one. The level involved a round room with a pillar in the middle. The ghost himself had big eyes and a large multi-coloured mouth and tongue. Behind him there was a smaller ghost with an egg timer/sand timer/hourglass. Taking on the boss and defeating him was easy in theory. You basically had to attack the little ghost with the hourglass behind King Boom Boo, which would cause a timed door to open. This would then cause King Boom Boo to disappear into the ground, where you dig him up, hit him as many times as you could before the door closes and the sun goes, causing King Boom Boo to grow back to normal size again. Defeating him though was a hard one. It was similar to chasing someone round a room, and when you turn another way, so does he. In fighting King Boom Boo, the first thing you needed to do was to get away from him and his blue hand fire-ball attack (and later his tongue attack), before getting behind him to strike at the smaller ghost, the only thing is though that he quickly turns around to come at you again. For several attempts which I remembered span over several weeks, I was unlucky, but there was a clue as to how to strike at the little ghost.

GameCube

 

When he had enough of chasing you, King Boom Boo would then breathe fire, preventing him from turning round. You could then use this to attack the little ghost and attack King Boom Boo. Getting him out of the ground is then not so hard as sometimes he’s on the floor, and others he’s on the pillar and you just need to climb up there. Getting more than one hit on him is hard though. King Boom Boo after he is dug out of the ground is large, cumbersome and slow, therefore easy to hit. After you hit him once though, he gets smaller and quicker, meaning that if you too were slow, you probably weren’t going to hit him again. I once did try going the other way, but he saw me and turned round (which was rather funny). In the end though it came down to several more attempts getting in 1 hit at a time, luckily though the boss levels have a health bar at the top to show you how much health the opponent has left. So after several weeks and attempts, I finally beat the wretched ghost, and the game saved successfully so I did not need to do it again. Up next though was the Egg Golem (which is another story for another time).

Egg Golem

Despite how long it took and how hard it was; King Boom Boo remains one of my favourite and most memorable boss fights of any video game I have played. I still have the game to this day (and have yet to complete the third story), same copy and everything, but I now look forward to the ghost boss level as I consider it a mid to late milestone for the Hero Story. I look forward to it because I know what I am doing, and it gives me another opportunity to listen to the Fantastic soundtrack, plus; it’s a nicely designed, well thought out boss level and I was surprised by it, for only then to have it followed by yet another hard boss level. Possibly more though, I remember it fondly because it took me so long to complete it, and to this day, look forward to enjoy and remember such an experience like that again in video gaming – and for now, I know just where to get it.

GENEPOOL (I also remember seeing King Boom Boo in an episode of Sonic X).

 





Shadow The Hedgehog: The Final Word

17 06 2015

Shadow The Hedgehog (SEGA - 2005)

Several years ago, I used to collect Official Nintendo Magazine, I still have them actually. It was back when I was a big gamer and played on mostly Nintendo consoles. Eventually though, maybe two years ago, I just stopped collecting them, I don’t think I actually had a proper good read of one for a year before that. Anyway, the magazine continuously changed every few issues to keep it fresh and one of the magazine sections that stuck around for a while was a readers section. This was where anyone who wrote letters in, or (more commonly) from the online forums would get a say. When it came to the online forums, ONM used to show a pie chart of percentages of what people talked about most that month, and one of the most commonly featured topics in the pie chart was a lot of people showing their support for a spinoff game of the Sonic the Hedgehog series; Shadow The Hedgehog.

ONM Magazine

I never actually looked into those topics on the forums, my forum footprint overall was pretty low; however it always interested me to see people defend Shadow the Hedgehog. I remember first reading about the game and being a fan of the Sonic series at the time (and also my liking for the character of Shadow), I was excited about it. I remember even getting a copy of it for my GameCube when it was first released, and remembered hearing friends and other people talk about their opinions for the game, where the result was normally positive. One thing I did not understand though, was why (roughly) 25% of the readership of the magazine wrote on the forums every month just to defend a specific game. The other percentages used to talk about new stuff or current games and opinions; so why is another talking about one game in particular? I mean, what was so bad about Shadow the Hedgehog in the first place. When I originally played it, I thought it was quite fun. I played it quite a lot and really got into it. Ok, it wasn’t like it had no flaws at all but I thought it was OK. With the game being nearly 10 years old now, I thought I would reminisce a little by looking back at it and giving a more hindsight view on what I thought of the final product. While the post may say “The Final Word”, this probably, more than likely, won’t be the last time someone talks about this game, but due to the interest in people defending the game, I thought I would give and highlight my thoughts on the game, then hopefully come up with some overall rating for it (I probably won’t do this again in the future as it probably won’t work).

Shadow

1. Setting – Shadow is a hedgehog (like sonic, but black in colour) who has something of a mysterious past that comes back to him in flashbacks he doesn’t relatively understand. For the most part he is a loner and only cares for himself and some mysterious girl called Maria. One day, an Alien Invasion by a race known as the Black Arms suddenly happens. At first he doesn’t care, but is then approached by the races master; Black Doom who says that if Shadow can bring him the Chaos Emeralds, he will reveal Shadows past. The alien invasion setting then sets the game up for the player to take shadow on a story plot that allows the player to take different routes and discover and play different levels while also discovering Shadows Past. The games’ setting is pretty interesting and as its core point of storytelling goes, it’s pretty cool; however it’s all over the place. One moment you are fighting off an alien invasion, the next, you are nowhere near the invasion, to doing something that happened 50 years previously, or fighting a completely different enemy altogether. Because you are not too sure of where you are supposed to be, it feels more like a game without story than a game that sort of promises to tell you a story while discovering it yourself at the same time. While it is interesting to discover new things and experiences other bits, for a story telling adventure, it’s a bit poor. 2/5.

S4

2. Gameplay Part 1: Storytelling – The game offers you choices of routes to take from level to level, meaning the game is not linear. In fact the game uses a story tree which allows players to pick a route to take and follow it to where it goes. To do this, they have 3 choices of mission per level (as far as I know, I didn’t get as far as the end of each story side). One route choice will take the player on the hero path, another on the dark path, and the other on the horizontal normal route. If the player goes down the normal route that just comes to the point of reaching the end of the level for the other 2 though it usually requires completing an in game goal or completing the level in a certain way. So it could be activating or finding things in level, or it could be defeating so many enemies to destroying something. Relatively simple……….in theory. It’s one of the larger issues I have with the game. The problem is, that while it sounds relatively simple; some of those side missions can turn out to be rather complex. Some are easier than others but when it comes down to either finding so many of one thing, or collecting the other, finding them in the first place can be very irritating, especially when there is only one left, and while you may get to the point of certainty knowing where it is, finding it at all again is tricky. Keeping it to those routes to get to new levels can become even more irritating if you accidently end up doing a level you may have already done once before, and when you play levels over and over again, it gets really boring. Then even if you are successful in completing the mission correctly to go onto the next stage, you may end up taking on one of the games various random bosses, which is tedious unto itself. It is a rather inventive and exciting way to play a sonic game as it is not linear and the choice of routes can be quite fun (as well as add replay value to find more levels), but in turn, is annoying. 3/5.

S1

3. Gameplay Part 2: Core Gameplay Mechanics – The games striking main feature is that the lead character gets to wield a gun. Possibly thinking; that without something extra or different, it would look just like a normal Sonic game; the developers gave an already anti-hero character his own choice of weaponry. The game bolsters a huge selection of firearms with some different per level, and while Shadow doesn’t necessarily have to use them, it does add something else to the game. Most times guns are just picked up from fallen enemies, and depending on the enemies and area will vary the choice of available firearms. I find it’s a lot like Half Life in that respect with the amount of different types, but when there is in some cases little variation it can be a bit repetitive, but not necessarily boring. The inclusion of a gun though doesn’t really seem to provide much though, as there are lots of shooting games on the market and the only thing that’s different with this one is that it’s in a Sonic game. Shadow does not necessarily need a gun however, he is powerful enough without. I think it’s more of an image thing than anything else, but I would rather him have a gun he can keep than having lots that do not last very long. After that though there isn’t much except for regular abilities that sonic can use in previous games. The only other one that stands out is in the 2 power bars that can be built up during levels. These are filled up when attacking certain enemies or doing other things of note. One is a hero bar, the other is dark and when one has been filled up it can be used. These are actually quite useful as one allows you to travel huge levels of distance in the game making the levels shorter, while the other works similarly to the Team Blast feature in Sonic Heroes where you can wipe out huge numbers of enemies that are currently on-screen. It’s a very nice feature which is also something a little bit different to other games. 4/5.

S3

4. Visuals – Visuals come down to 2 points, cinematics and in game. The cinematics look terrific and add an extra special something to the story telling side of the game. The cut scenes and in game visuals however, which use the same graphics look rather basic and can put a sour note on the games look. For the most part the visuals don’t look that bad, but when considering that the visuals for some cut scenes don’t use the cinematic look, it just looks basic as if it was done half-heartedly. The cut scenes are nicely done in what they are trying to say and set up the levels well, but compared to what is achieved in the more cinematic cut scenes, they could be better. The opening cinematic though is fantastic and really helps to set up the feel of the whole game. 3/5.

5. Bosses and other Characters – The boss levels are not exactly varied. My experience mostly ended up with me takin on mostly Dr. Eggman in boss matches that were quite hard. The only other boss levels I had were against the black bull alien thing and the heavy dog, both of which were still pretty hard. The end boss for all my attempts was the Egg Dealer which was a lot more simple (and enjoyable) but weird. It was the case that once you knew how to defeat it, all you needed to do was just keep hitting it with your homing attack. The other thing about it was its choice of when to enter the game. One of the last levels on a route of the tree was the black comet where you would expect to find some kind of alien monster to fight. No; for some reason it was Eggman. It made more sense when I was in Eggman’s base, but not on the comet. Apart from the Egg dealer, Boss levels were pretty weak, if it was not for the choice of music to go with them, which ups the score for it a little. As for the use of other characters in the game that you randomly meet on the way in some levels, I think it’s rather pointless with the only good new character being the commander of G.U.N. (and some allowance to Black Doom, but only a bit). 2/5.

Omega E-123

6. Levels and Multiplayer – The levels in the game were nice and varied if but a bit dodgy. It’s sort of all over the place with areas depending on the routes you take. However the choice of levels and the things you can do in them are a relative improvement compared to the storytelling side. The levels are designed in strange combinations with some being like classic Sonic levels (platforms and lots of running), while others are like mazes and slow routes with lots of fighting. And then you have the completely weird ones like the circus based world, and a couple inside computers. The colouring of the levels is sometimes bright and sometimes dark but with plenty of variation. While the things you can do in the levels are really up to the story direction, the levels are much better in contrast. Multiplayer I did not get to play much of except on one occasion, however it was weird and fun to experience. 4/5.

S2

7. Soundtrack – For all the game’s up and downs, there is one thing that does not disappoint: the game’s soundtrack. While the levels, characters, missions and bosses are constantly in a state of mismatch, the one thing that does work is the choice of music to the game level. While some levels are similar to one another, great care has been taken to make the soundtrack work and meet the feel and look of each level. Added to this is the soundtrack for the boss levels, cut scenes, characters, cinematics and even the credits; which altogether makes something that works at a consistent rate, and not only that is both enjoyable, and memorable at the same time. I will probably go more into certain pieces of soundtrack in a later post, but particular ones to look out for include the opening cinematic theme (I Am… All of Me), Digital Circuit, Sky Troops and the end credits theme (Waking Up). 5/5.

So, that’s the game in essence, so now to work out its score. So ‘add the numbers together and then divide by the number of categories.’ 2 + 3 + 4 + 3 + 2 + 4 + 5 = 23 ÷ 7 = 3.285714285714286. So to round it to a reasonable number, I would say it gives Shadow the Hedgehog as score of 3 making it something of an average game of highs and lows. It has great gameplay mechanics, interesting levels and a fantastic soundtrack but is somewhat hindered by everything else.  It’s not completely Pants, but it’s not really Great either. You might be able to see something else in it than I didn’t, but altogether; that’s what I think f Shadow the Hedgehog. It will more than likely still be debated for some years to come, but for now, it’s somewhere in the middle (plus I have other things to do).

Vector

GENEPOOL





Game Dev Tycoon

14 01 2015

Game Dev Tycoon Logo

Several years ago I dreamed and tried to get into the Video Games Industry, unfortunately I was unsuccessful in achieving this due to me being terrible at programming (C++ in particular). While originally down hearted I moved on and decided to pursue a different career altogether. This past week however I stepped into the video games industry, by playing Game Dev Tycoon on Steam.

Steam (Valve Corporation, 2003 - Present)

Game Dev Tycoon (produced by Greenheart Games) allows the player the opportunity to start their own video game company and rise through the ranks in a 35 year period creating video games for a variety of consoles and research new techniques and topics in the hope of becoming the biggest video game company in the world. You start in your garage on a simple PC but as your company gets bigger and better, you obtain new premises. From your work space you can create your own video games. This involves choosing a topic, genre and platform. As you research new topics you can research new things to choose from including making your own custom game engine, target audiences and multiple platforms and genres. As the game progresses further you can unlock more options as to what kind of work you go into including work contracts and publishing deals and as your operation gets larger and larger you will need to hire more people.

GDT1

You don’t need to worry too much about detail though when it comes to making a game as this involves a little mini game where you chooses what you want it to be, give it a name and designation and then move little sliders up and down in certain topics and then attaching certain members of your team to work on certain elements when making a much bigger game. Then when it is complete you need to air out the bugs in the programme, then release it and wait for the reviews of it and see how it sells. Juggling all of these elements is hard work but if you’re capable of it and succeed you can make a lot of cash. But even then that is not an easy thing.

GDT2

Like other Tycoon games, Game Dev Tycoon isn’t exactly easy. The biggest problem is making enough money to stay afloat. The first few games you produce it is sort of easy, but you lose £8,000 (money denominations don’t really exist in the game and instead money is represented as standard figures with K representing thousand and M million) each week in operation. This increases the bigger your company gets and soon a few thousand won’t cut it. It is easy enough though to make a few hundred thousand but you will need to start making more. Bigger games offer this opportunity, but are expensive to produce, and while you could get a publishing deal (which helps garner more fans to your company and bigger titles less risky), the only problem is, is that if you don’t meet a certain level of requirements in the reviews stage they will fine you and you only get so much money in royalties from the publisher. Then next to that there is the money you may or not spend on marketing and then the cubicle at G3. Money is required to do everything and it is not easy to come by it, particularly if you are behind the competition.

GDT4

Research is very important in this game and research is harder to come by than money, but it needs to be done. In the early stages of your company you will use it to get basic things, like a custom game engine and other topics, but as you get bigger and bigger, it’s important to study more techniques and improve your games in the long haul as 2D and text-based games are not going to cut it on a PlaySystem 2. Oh yeah, that’s another thing, Game Dev Tycoon adds a little humour to the game industry, taking things that exist and then spinning on them. E3 becomes G3, Companies like Sega and Sony become Vega and Vonny and game consoles look like their real version but with a spin on design, colour and name, like Game Sphere (GameCube).

GDT6

Game Dev Tycoon is a lot of fun to play and relatively addictive as it is quite simple. There are several short comings to it though. In the early parts of the game, the only way to know what works in a game is to make it, wait for the reviews then write a game report. In those early stages it is easy to make a rubbish game and easily fluke a good one. Good reviews help with money, but if your game is rubbish, you have little chance of making profit. It was not until my third attempt (first to companies went bankrupt, third was the only time so far that I was able to get to the end of the 35 years and still not be in debt; the company name was Mighty Pigeon) that the research and studies into certain points helped that I got a knack in what I was doing and made good games continuously. But the reviews can still be pretty random and it is hard to get it exactly right. Game Reports do help with this though. The game also throws huge numbers of advice screens at you saying it would be easier to do publishing deals and get fan numbers before working on your own games; however the money isn’t really worth it. Other times the game does this is when it asks if you want to move to another studio and bigger operation. If you decide to wait some time, instead of giving you the option of a button to press when ready, you need to wait until the box comes up again, and if still not ready, it’s back to waiting (and some times the game buttons can stick when you click them).

GDT5

Making games can also get pretty tiresome and samey after a while and it’s only when you research new options that things get a little more interesting. However; in order to make these games with new options and possibilities, you need to put them into a new game engine and only then can they be used. So, you end up spending most of your research points you acquire on new things to make bigger and better game engines. And this can get really annoying, particularly as research is scarcer than money and you need it to train your staff as well. Hiring more people helps with this issue, but hiring is expensive and operating cash gets drier the more people you hire. In the end, you need to make compromises and try to figure out what is more important, and for me and the company it was the engine. Hiring staff though does mean you can put certain people on certain tasks that they are better at than others, but you will need to send them on vacation at some point.

GDT3

Game Dev Tycoon isn’t exactly what you would call easy, it’s easier than some Tycoon games but it is relatively a hard game. But in many a way it’s more a puzzle based game similar to some flash titles online than a tycoon based game. But altogether Game Dev Tycoon is rather fun to play and also can be quite addictive. Even if the game gets samey in spots, you still care about trying to get money (or like I did in my fourth game, tried to make rubbish games to go bankrupt). It can be interesting in places when you produce a game that the reviews say is mediocre but then goes on to become something of a hit, but most of these instances involve a publishing deal. While the game can also be horrible to you as well, sometimes it can give you surprises. While the game does have shortcomings including fewer options when it comes to research and the constant advice boxes and it’s reply value is rather small and only for the pursuit of doing better, and the story of the game is the same every time, I do rather like this game. It may not be to every body’s tastes or as big as games like Borderlands or Call of Duty; Game Dev Tycoon is a nice small game to play when you have some time to play something short, and also gives an insight into the world of Video Games Development also.

GENEPOOL








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