Film News – Pacific Rim 2

9 07 2014

Pacific Rim (Legendary Pictures - 2013)

Released in 2013 by Legendary Pictures in association with Warner Bros. and Directed by the Legendary Guillermo del Toro, Pacific Rim was a film about mankind banding together to produce Giant Robots called Jaegers in the seemingly endless fight to rid the world from the threat of giant monsters called Kaiju. The film starred Charlie Hunnam, Idris Elba, Rinko Kikuchi and Ron Perlman. If you haven’t seen it, check it out. Well, after almost a year of waiting, it has finally been announced that a Sequel is finally underway.

Reports on a Pacific Rim sequel have been going round since before the first film’s release last year. It was not until after the film came out that more reports were made. Writer Travis Beacham and director Guillermo Del Toro were on board to do a sequel and had apparently had already started writing the film by October despite the film not yet being confirmed and had announced possible ideas for the film including “Gipsy 2.0” and “merging of Kaiju and Jaeger”. By June this year Del Toro further mentioned that he had been writing the sequel along with X-Men: The Last Stand writer Zak Penn with Pacific Rim creator Travis Beacham deciding to drop out to work on Hieroglyph but as the announcement has been made that Hieroglyph has now been cancelled, this could show a possible opening for Beacham to return. Then, late June, it was finally confirmed by Del Toro (who was busy finishing his latest film; Crimson Peak) that a sequel was finally confirmed and that he would be directing it along with the announcement that an animated series will be developed as well along with a continuation of Pacific Rim: Tales From Year Zero; a graphic novel released to coincide with Pacific Rim. The film will still be produced by Legendary Pictures, but now that their distribution partnership with Warner Bros. has ended, Pacific Rim 2 will be distributed by Universal Studios. So far, not much has been mentioned about what the sequel will involve, but it has been confirmed (at least in the script) that the characters of Mako (Rinko Kikuchi) and Raleigh (Charlie Hunnam) will be returning.

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I am already excited about this news. I loved Pacific Rim, my favourite film of 2013. I loved it’s Monsters, Robots, Story and Characters and with this news, I am so happy. Pacific Rim 2 has been slated for a 2017 release, three years from now, but given what Legendary were able to accomplish with Pacific Rim, I am ok with that to a point, and while I want to see a new film sooner than later, it gives me and everyone else something to look forward too as well as time for Legendary to make the film as good as it can be. Also it puts us in a rather interesting situation. You see, Pacific Rim was released 10 months before the recent Godzilla, and with Gareth Edwards going to Lucasfilm to produce the first standalone Star Wars film, it could be another four years until a sequel to Godzilla gets released, so by my reckoning about 2018 given what the current standard is for producing films; however this means that when Pacific Rim 2 gets released, it may only be a year until Godzilla 2. I just hope though that development begins on Godzilla 2 now rather than 2 years down the line, meaning that when Edwards returns, he is able to just get stuck in and not have to go through a whole 4 years worth of development all over again.

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It is going to be some time until Pacific Rim 2 is released, but in the mean time there are many films still to be released to tie us over for now, and with Pacific Rim already out on Home Media and with Godzilla not far off from being released onto DVD and Blu-ray, we can just watch those two over and over again to our hearts content until the new films are released. So much good stuff to look forward to.

PR3 (Not the first time that the Sydney Opera House has been attacked by a Giant Monster).

GENEPOOL (Click Here for my Pacific Rim review)





Steel Heroes or Monsters (Part 2) – Pacific Rim

5 08 2013

Pacific Rim (Legendary Pictures - 2013)

One of the more standout features of Pacific Rim was the Special Effects in the CGI department. For many years I have consistently stated that Jurassic Park had the best Special Effects to date, even after Avatar was released. But now, for me anyway that has changed to Pacific Rim. Pretty much all of the Robot and Monster Scenes were CGI except for patches where it was more on a level with the human cast. The effects are most apparent in the Hong Kong fight. The effects used for the Giant Stars were not clumpy in their look or movement, they looked real and had a more fluid motion in what they did, be it punching or throwing or something else. The movement was most fluid though for the Kaiju as they are a more organic life form and when they moved it looked more like an animal than a big robot.  The lighting also worked brilliantly with light not only bouncing off the Iron/Steel Jaegers, but also off the rain. The fire and water effects were lovely altogether even if the scene took place underwater, you could see what was going on clearly in a dark setting but it did not just look like some kind of blank void.

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When I went to see Pacific Rim, I went to see it in 3D. At first I was unsure of seeing it in 3D at first given my past experience with 3D films. I have previously seen a couple of films in 3D since this sort of new wave of 3D films. One was Up which featured two noticeable scenes where 3D was used and the other was the new Clash of the Titans where the only bit of 3D was in the trailers. When I went to see Pacific Rim however, the 3D effects actually worked. In this case though, there were almost no scenes that didn’t have a piece of 3D about it. From the start of the film where stars are moving around past your eyes, to points part way through when you could see a blue monster brain at the corner of your eye, and it felt like it was right next to you. While 3D does seem to be diminishing, Pacific Rim shows that it can be done properly and effectively providing that the production team work to do it effectively. Current 3D presentation at best is when it is a frequent occurrence in a film and not just every (Unnoticeable) now and again as well as pulling off the right effect.

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A great lot of work has gone into the detail of the films main point, the Giant Robots. Shortly before the film’s release, Legendary released a couple of videos showing off how the team went on about designing both the Kaiju and the Jaegers. The Jaegers do have a look about them which is reminiscent of the machines seen in Japanese Anime but are not copies of them. To me, the designs look a lot like the Megazords from Power Rangers and Super Sentei as they do have a human look to them. A surprising amount of detail has also been added to the smaller parts of the machines as well. It’s as if the producers of the films designed manuals for each machine as if they were actually built. The design of each Jaeger also have a sense of steam punk about them as they do look very industrialized while also showing off some connection with the country they come from. The American machine (Gipsy Danger) is very tall but does not look lumbering and is clearly designed for good old hand to hand combat, something it shares with the Australian Jaeger (Striker Eureka) while the Chinese Jaeger (Crimson Typhoon) on the other hand is more like a lumbering brute but has a martial arts sense about it with its combat style, spinning blades and its three arm advantage and one eye look makes it look menacing. The Russian machine (Cherno Alpha) meanwhile is an ancient machine and looks the part; this in turn is represented by its style which looks more like it was designed for defence first with its big head and then attack second with the idea that strength is everything.

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The Kaiju in comparison are more animal like. The Kaiju have many traits about them which relate to those of animals in the real world. One of the early Kaijus looks like a Crocodile as well as a Goblin Shark, while the big bruisers later in the film are more like Gorillas while keeping a reptilian appearance. This gives the big monsters their own independent look instead of just randomly produced or just the same creature over and over again. When designing the Kaiju monsters, the production team tried to make their appearance similar to those of Japanese Kaiju films with the idea being that you have to imagine a man being inside the creature, like a Monster suit. This is achieved brilliantly and makes the fight scenes, while completely CGI, more fluid in their fighting and more believable as result. The slightly humanistic look of their fighting styles also raises tension due to the uniqueness of it and less animal like which is more random. The more animalistic part of the Kaiju comes into it when they are moving about and stomping/crushing on buildings. Like the Jaegers, the Kaiju have had a lot of detail done to them on the smaller scale to including scales, the hands, wings, legs and arms and even more so to the face which includes emotions. It is also not the design of the creatures that have subtle hints towards Japanese Kaiju films, but also in the Kaiju theories. The Kaiju in the film are rated in categories depending on their overall size and power. This category system is named the Serizawa Scale which is a nice little tribute to the original Godzilla film as one of the characters in the film was named Serizawa. I think that’s quite nice.

You may be thinking that with this level of detail for the monsters and robots that the human may have been shunned to one side in production. Well they haven’t, a lot of detail has been put into the human part with elements of Monster religion as well as other things. The main bridge for this is through the use of the Kaiju Black-market which also introduces these other elements as well as show off smaller elements about the Kaiju.

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Pacific Rim’s soundtrack (Produced by Ramin Djawadi) is one of the standout points for me personally. The soundtrack has a nice range of themes for such an epic scaled film with pieces that are best used when they are in a large open space to show the size and scale. The soundtrack though gets better on the human point of view when the Jaegers are in shot. The film’s main theme is used a lot when Gipsy Danger is in shot. it comprises of lots of brass sections with some electric guitars and gives a hero element to the machines, it shows that they are not just weapons, they are heroes. It’s just like if Superman or Batman were to arrive on scene, you know that things are a bout to change in the face of conflict, you feel safe and secure; something that the main theme for Pacific Rim does well.

The best part of the soundtrack though is when the Kaiju are in the foreground. When you see the monsters, particularly during the Hong Kong scene the soundtrack gives out a loud low note or element. It is the kind of sound produced by heavy brass sections of an orchestra and traditional Asian drums. The soundtrack in this instance sounds a lot like a Japanese Kaiju film. In professional wrestling there is a wrestler known as The Undertaker who has a very familiar entrance where the bongs of a bell can be heard before he makes his appearance. It is the same here but with a more traditional Asian feel. It’s the entrance of the Kaiju if you will, it gives them their own unique soundtrack from the rest of the film, and it feels amazing. It brought back moments for me of Monster films like The Host when the monster surfaces for the first time. But more than that, it felt a lot like a Godzilla film. Instead of just making a run of the mill Monster Movie, it showed the commitment and passion needed into making a Good Monster Movie.

Pacific Rim also did something extra special which is not done as regularly as it should be done in Cinema. Many films these days have an extra scene in the credits, a spoiler for a sequel usually or maybe just a funny extra scene. Pacific Rim however did not do this, it did something extra special. It had a dedication, a dedication to two of cinemas greatest film makers. The Late Great’s Ray Harryhausen and Ishirō Honda. That is something which does not happen a lot these days which is a real shame, they appear not to take time to say thank you to those who have helped to shape and build cinema by doing things that captured the eyes of those that they entertained. Ray Harryhausen is of course the Special Effects master who produced many Monster Movies including The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms and the original Clash of the Titans. Ishirō Honda (my Favourite Director) is the man who produced many Japanese Kaiju films with films like Atragon and Mothra but was best known for his work in the Godzilla film series as the director of 8 films in the series including the original 1954 film. Pacific Rim is a fitting tribute to the careers of these two Amazing people.

Ray Harryhausen and Ishiro Honda

Pacific Rim is an Amazing film. I am so pleased that Travis Beacham proposed the film in the first place and that Guillermo del Toro joined the project, because if they didn’t, we wouldn’t have had this Amazing film. Films of this scale and size are rarely produced these days, which is a real shame, because they are absolutely incredible. But Pacific Rim does show films like these and Monster Movies in particular still have the power to WOW audiences of all ages and can adapt without losing their integrity. It is now less than a year to go until Legendary Pictures release their new Godzilla film, so while we wait for that, we have another Amazing Monster Movie to enjoy here and now. Pacific Rim is the best film so far this decade.

GENEPOOL (Pacific Rim is practically perfect, there is only one thing that the film is missing).








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