It Took The God Out Of Godzilla – Godzilla (1998)

5 03 2014

Godzilla 1998 (TriStar Pictures - 1998)

Yes, it’s true, this is my review of the 1998 Godzilla film. Well I thought that with the new film coming out (which I hope will correct everything that went ‘horribly wrong’ with the 1998 film) I would take the opportunity to review this film. Now, bear in mind, while I could state (over and over again) why this film is not a Godzilla film, I (hopefully) will try to keep it short as not to bore you and aim to delve more deeply into why the 1998 Godzilla is not a Godzilla film in a few weeks’ time.

Godzilla 1954

I was actually very excited back in 1998 to the release of the 1998 Godzilla film (obviously given the date). I remember hearing way back in 1996 on a films programme (I think it was on Channel 4) stating the film was due for release in 1998, and had a picture of the Japanese Monster himself. So I had memorized the date, so come 1998, I was really looking forward to what was coming. BBC TWO even had a one-off night in celebration of the upcoming film called Monster Night with a documentary on the history of Godzilla, monster fights and two amazing films: King Kong (1976) and the Fantastic Godzilla vs King Ghidorah, One of the best. There was lots of clips (including the “It’s Pregnant” scene, revealing a pivotal plot point before the film’s release; Thanks) and trailers for the film being shown on other shows too including Blue Peter. Then came the film itself (directed by Roland Emmerich I should add), and I quite enjoyed it (at first), it had ‘the creature’ and to begin with I thought it was quite good (although to be fair, I was only 9 years old). It is only the intervening years when I read and discovered more in the film series, that I began to discover the flaws, and some recent viewings have also changed my thoughts on the film, greatly, so prepare for a review, 16 years in the making (sounds like Jurassic Park doesn’t it).

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The film begins in an old 1950’s/1960’s documentary style video showing something happening in French Polynesia. In time this becomes a video of the test of a Nuclear Weapon (Amazing Scene combined with the soundtrack). After the test dies down, a solitary Iguana’s egg seemingly has survived as the rain arrives. A few decades later a Japanese fish processing vessel is attacked by an unknown entity, with claws and a tail. In Chernobyl meanwhile, a biologist called Dr. Nicko “Nick” Tatopoulos (Matthew Broderick) is playing with Earthworms when two men arrive (one of them being Glenn Morshower) telling him that he has been re-assigned. In Tahiti a group of Frenchmen arrive at a hospital where they talk to a survivor of the vessel accident who is at first reserved to talk to them, but when the lead Frenchman (Jean Reno) manages to get the survivor’s attention, the survivor says “Gojira”. Nick Tatopoulos arrives by military escort in Panama and is introduced to Colonel Hicks (Kevin Dunn) and tries to explain to the Colonel why he was studying worms and is led into a Giant Footprint. He meets Dr. Elsie Chapman (Vicki Lewis) and Dr. Mendel Craven (Malcolm Danare) who are studying the footprints.

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In Manhattan New York, a young woman named Audrey Timmons (Maria Pitillo) who works for a New York News Channel alongside Lucy Palotti (Arabella Field) dreams of being a reporter and asks her boss Charles Caiman (Harry Shearer) if there has been any news on a potential future job, which there appears not to be. In Jamaica the science and military team stumble upon the wreck of the fishing vessel, where the Frenchmen are also. The lead from earlier introduces himself to Colonel Hicks saying he is an insurance agent. Colonel Hicks orders him out of the area, and while doing so, the lead spots Nick briefly before walking off. Off the eastern seaboard meanwhile three fishing trawlers get pulled underwater, this is reported to Colonel Hicks, with Elsie thinking that this thing is some long-lost dinosaur, but nick suggests that the creature is an entirely new species. A fisherman goes down to Manhattan Harbor in the pouring rain, and seemingly catches something big which then robs the man of his fishing rod. Out at sea the man sees a giant wave come towards him, with two big spikes coming out of the water. Out of the water comes a titanic beast which goes on a rampage of the fishing area of Manhattan. During this time, Mayor Ebert (Michael Lerner) and his assistant Gene (Lorry Goldman) are speaking at a rally, as large thuds are heard with mini earthquakes, this is followed by the creature crashing the session. In a Manhattan Café, Audrey, Lucy, and Lucy’s wife Victor “Animal” Palotti (Hank Azaria) are discussing Audrey’s nice attitude before moving onto Audrey’s old boyfriend Nick who she spots on the TV with the Army. The thuds arrive and the creature’s feet are seen moving past the building. Animal grabs his camera and chases after it, only to be almost trodden by it.

The Military and Science team arrive in Manhattan after the creature seemingly vanishes. Hicks is introduced to Sergeant O’Neil (Doug Savant) who states the creature just disappeared, Nick meanwhile doesn’t think so, then there is a report on the incident, with footage from Animal. At the news company, Animal is heralded as a hero, and Audrey steals Caiman’s Press badge. The Mayor meanwhile tries to get a hold of the situation, only for the Lead Frenchman to put a microphone on him. An underground scene of destruction is found, believing the creature went through it. Nick suggests that the creature is just an animal and when a fish is found, a plan is put into place to lure the creature out and kill it. This leads to the creature coming into full view for the first time, and burping at Nick. The creature eats all the fish and is then attacked by the army, who are unsuccessful in dealing with it. Audrey and Nick meet each other for the first time in years and grab a coffee at the base, where nick discovers the creature may be pregnant. As he goes off to do more testing, Audrey steals a tape of confidential footage in an attempt to make a quick name for herself.

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The military searches the city without much look, Nick tells the Army of his findings just when Audrey’s report comes on, which has been stolen by Caiman and names the creature Godzilla. Nick is kicked off the team, but implores Lucy to get hicks to search for the eggs. Audrey tries to apologize to Nick, who doesn’t want to listen. Nick heads for the airport, secretly followed by animal, which leads to Nick being kidnapped by the lead Frenchman who introduces himself as Philippe Roaché and is taken to an old warehouse full of weapons. The Frenchmen are agents of the DGSE (Directorate-General for External Security), the French intelligence agency. They have been watching the whole incident with a close eye in the hope of covering up their country’s role in the incident. They plan to look for the creature’s nest. Back in New York, Animal convinces Audrey to go with him, and follow the Frenchmen. In the sewers where the fish was found earlier, Godzilla appears to the search team who, after avoiding him, trace the creature’s steps. In Manhattan the military put a new plan into action to kill Godzilla by luring him into the open, this plan seemingly fails and Godzilla is chased into the Hudson river where he is seemingly killed by a couple of submarines.

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In the sewers, the search arrives at Madison Square Garden where over 200 eggs are discovered and when trying to destroy them, they all hatch. The creatures attack the search team and Animal and Audrey thinking they are food. After meeting up with each other (minus several Frenchmen who have all been eaten) the four people send a message to the military and the outside world telling them the building must be destroyed. Fighters are sent and the four just barely get out of the building. Then Godzilla arrives, not dead after all and sees the group next to the dead bodies of his hatchlings. He chases after the group, driving past a military escort who are seemingly going to Madison Square Garden. Nick manages to contact O’Neil and after a couple of minutes in Godzilla’s mouth, they lead the creature to the Brooklyn Bridge where he is entangled in it and attacked by fighters. Godzilla dies, The city celebrates, Audrey quits her job and Philippe disappears. Back in Madison Square Garden, One Egg survives, then hatches.

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Godzilla’s Cast is a bit of an oddball selection of both good and bad. Matthew Broderick’s character is generally quite annoying and rather than being the lead human appears, initially and majority, a piece of comedy relief. While he does make up for it at the end of the film by being more intelligent than his character is meant to be as well as compassionate towards those around him, but it feels a bit too late for him, and I think the running joke that no one can appear to pronounce his character’s last name is a bit overdone. Maria Pitillo’s character on the other hand is actually quite likeable as in her character develops as the film goes on and at least is honest for the majority. While attitude is something that is ‘apparently’ needed in Manhattan, her character is best when she is just herself and there is a nice on-screen presence whenever she is around, even if she is the somewhat combination of the purposed damsel in distress/love interest. In many a sense, she is a tougher character than Broderick’s character. Hank Azaria’s character is seemingly also a Comedy Relief, but deep down he is a good character as in he is more a sense of reasoning among the characters as he is more down to earth than everyone else and is comedic look and acting is more about him being him and not comedic for the purpose of it. Jean Reno’s character though is the top dog of the film’s human main cast. He gives off a great performance as a secret agent and he physically looks intimidating as he does not appear to smile. It’s like he is hiding something and while there are hints here and there, he gets a proper reveal and is a serious man as he does it, not one who takes his position lightly.

Broderick, Pitillo, Azaria, Reno

The main standouts though, are the film’s supporting characters. Sergeant O’Neil has a sense of being comedic as it shows he is a bit clumsy, making his character seem on par or equal with Nick, but as a character, he is far better than Nick as Nick is like a stereotypical Nerd while O’Neil is a professional soldier and much more likeable as a result. Colonel Hicks is well-played and is one of the films standouts. He gives the appearance of a well-trained soldier and officer but deep down has a calm and understandable side to him making him likeable to those around him, and a much more preferable person in dealing in a situation than any ordinary soldier or officer. Lucy Palotti is very likeable despite her wild exterior. While she plays the sort of agony aunt character type wife to Animal, she shows great control over her emotions and can be a calm reassuring person deep down and that’s why she is so likeable.

Savant, Dunn, Field

But it’s not just them; some of the film’s most appealing characters off to the side are the film’s extras. While the French Spies are almost like the Frogs from Flushed Away (ok, it was 8 years later) as in they are almost made fun of as to what they do, they are quite nicely played. Some of the best though are in the military scenes, such as the Utah Submarine Captain (Derek Webster) and his number two, The Anchorage Captain (David Pressman), The Navy Admiral (Richard Gant), The Helicopter pilot in the second attack on Godzilla and also the army man Nick and Philippe encounter as they re-enter New York. Added to that you have Glenn Morshower’s brief appearance and the two Japanese men on the bridge of the fishing vessel when it goes down. In many a sense, it is the little touches or in this cases appearances that help.

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The film’s special effects, well those for Godzilla anyway, are outstanding. As good as Jurassic Park in my opinion, particularly when you include the scenes of the whole creature in full view, such as his initial attack on Manhattan, first full sighting and the second attack on him including the moment when the soldier looks down at him and when he is walking through the streets as well as his close up with the military personnel. The sound effects during this point help too. His roar is that of like Godzilla but he also makes some interesting, more like animal sounds too, giving him a bit of depth. The Eggs though, and most of the CGI Babies though are pretty atrocious, even for then. Godzilla looked Awesome in this film, how come the kiddies did not look the same and are at best when they are animatronics. Ok, while the eggs are not CGI but real, they do look like cardboard (I wonder if the same company worked on Les Miserables).

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The soundtrack (provided by David Arnold and Michael Lloyd) is not too bad either, there are times when the music lacks some depth such as the secret spy/French scenes and is somewhat lack luster, but when you take, the reveal scene of the creature halfway through, the keyboard has a sense of Phantom of the Opera about it, like a grand reveal or realization about it like this is something to behold. Another case is that of the opening titles which add an element of mystery followed by cold realized horror of what was happening, which was then followed by a sense of cold mystery and intrigue as the egg stands alone and then there is the pursuit style theme for the submarine attack also (not forgetting the soundtrack provided by Puff Daddy‘s; Come With Me remix of the Led Zeppelin Song Kashmir).

So now we move on to the down side. While I have stated that I will talk about this in more detail at a later time, I still need to at least cover the basics. The films main problem is that title: “GODZILLA”. With the idea that an American Godzilla film could happen where the biggest budgets could create an amazing film as well as show Godzilla to a potentially wider audience, it doesn’t exactly help when the creature in the film is not Godzilla. Godzilla is a giant monster, a metaphor for the destruction caused by nuclear power, a force of nature itself, Mother Nature putting her foot down and saying “enough” to man destroying the world. In comparison the creature in this film is just an animal, an animal just trying to live, acts like an animal, thinks like an animal and…..reproduces like an animal.  With the hope of big special effects for a legendary monster, what we got instead was a giant Iguana that is also a lot smaller than the original creature. While the destruction and panic caused by him was there, it was not completely there, as while he had the trademark dorsal spines, he was bent over like a T-Rex instead of up straight and without his famous Atomic Breath. This film in this case is ‘not really a Godzilla film at all’; it is just a Monster Movie with a famous name attached to it (sort of like the Karate Kid film a few years ago).

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Despite this though, the film does have some great scenes. The opening credits showing the full force of a nuclear weapon, something that is hardly shown in Cinema at all. The fishing scene is nicely made and the opening rampage is like that of a disaster movie but does not reveal the monster early on and just teases the audience with him (much like the character of Mayor Ebert’s name). then the grand appearance by him followed later on by the appearance by him for the second attack, plus the entire second attack including the scenes with the submarines.

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The Madison Square Garden nest scene though feels to be completely pointless and un-needed except for a reveal that Godzilla was not destroyed by the torpedoes. It just feels completely un-needed for this reason and feels like it is just there to fill up time. It also sort of lowers the tone of the film, the idea that there is something scary in Manhattan, something horrifying, and the idea that this scene’s tone has been lowered to allow some form of Family Friendliness for the whole family, instead of a proper action film if not a complete Monster Film.

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While it is slightly disappointing what has happened to this film due to its name, as a Monster Film it is rather enjoyable and even after 16 years, still looks pretty good. It has an interesting cast, some great scenes, and a good soundtrack. So while I can say that it is enjoyable, I will say this, and it is a bit predictable (by this point), don’t treat it like a Godzilla film, it isn’t, treat it as something different, and Let Godzilla move on from this and enjoy a potential new life in the eye of American cinema.

GENEPOOL





Godzilla News – Trailer

11 12 2013

Godzilla 2014 (Legendary Pictures - 2014)

“His power is unequalled. His battles are Legendary. His return is near”

Godzilla 2000 Trailer.

It has been almost 4 years now since the announcement that Legendary Pictures had received the rights from Toho to produce a new American Godzilla film. When the announcement was first made, statements were also made stating how this Godzilla was going to be more true to the Japanese Monster than to that American Impersonator. Well after almost 4 years of brief pieces of news here and footage and news exclusively at ComicCon, the first trailer to the new film has just been launched. Take a look:

The trailer has an odd premise as you’d expect it to be like most trailers in its buildup however this one involves, for most of the trailer, one scene. a scene of paratroopers falling from the sky. As they descend they eventually arrive just above what appears to be San Francisco, which seems to be engulfed in flames. Through the mask of one of these paratroopers a faint outline of a Titanic Monster can be seen. The trailer then shows some bits here and there of the film including shots of some of the films actors including Ken Watanabe (Inception, The Last Samurai) and Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad). the trailer then returns to a smoky, dusty image with something big black and dark moving behind it before seeing a better look of the creature and then hearing its roar.

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The most important aspect of this new film of course is the big lizard himself. From what I could see from the trailer, the scale is there as in he appears to be as Gigantic as he is portrayed in the original series. His trademark scales are there, looking imposing as well as terrifying but then when we see the creature in a much better outline, he looks amazing. Only time will really tell what the overall creature looks like, but already, he looks like the Great Monster that we have all come to know and love.

With the release of Pacific Rim (Also by Legendary Pictures) taking part earlier this year, with the amount of scale of the great robotic and monstrous hulks in that film, we can rest assured that for the time at least, things are looking up and while the new Godzilla film is not due out for another 6 months, this has given us plenty of opportunities to wet our appetites in anticipation, and as we get closer to the launch date, there is sure to be a more comprehensive trailer as well as possibly what the final design of the creature.

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GENEPOOL (The trailer does make me somewhat think of the trailer for Godzilla 2000 as well as a level in Battlefield 3).





A Brief History of Godzilla (100th Post)

25 05 2011

Godzilla 1954 - Present

Godzilla is a Gigantic Nuclear Monster. He is a force of nature that is Indestructible; it is a symbol of nature taking out its revenge on the world. Godzilla is also a Cinema Icon staring in 29 films. I thought that I would give you a brief history of Godzilla and show how one film in 1954 went on to become the Greatest film series in the History of Cinema (I will try to keep this brief, I might go into more detail another time or release it as a book).

Godzilla was created by Japanese film producer Tomoyuki Tanaka in 1954. In World War 2 Japan was hit by 2 nuclear weapons. Japan surrendered and around the pacific the Americans used the area to test new weapons. In 1952 there was a re-release of King Kong and in 1953 Ray Harryhausen released The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms. It was from the inspiration of these 2 films plus the event of weapon testing and 2 nuclear bombs which became the inspiration of a film. The other driving forces behind the film were director Ishiro Honda and special effects creator Eiji Tsuburaya. Tsuburaya would later become known as the Father of Japanese Special Effects.

“I was an actor in a film by Akira Kurosawa –The Seven Samurai. It was a very long job, it took a whole year to shoot but while were working on it, we kept hearing strange rumours. On set we would hear people talking about something called Godzilla. We kept hearing this name and none of us had any Idea what it was but nobody would tell us” – Yoshio Tsuchiya

Tanaka had an Idea for a large creature to come ashore and attack Japan. Eiji Tsuburaya told his Art Director Teizo Toshimitsu and Toshimitsu made many models out of clay and Tsuburaya chose the last one that Toshimitsu made. The name of the Monster came from two words Gojira (Japanese for Gorilla) and Kujira (Japanese for whale). It comes from an interesting story that may or may not have happened where 2 guys at Toho had these names and there was a ring to it. Another Idea is that it was renamed Godzilla when the American Distributor picked it up and edited the film to make it more appealing to an American audience. Another idea is that the name comes from the way that the name is pronounced. Many different ideas but all together the monster is called GODZILLA. Eiji Tsuburaya wanted to use Stop Motion effects like in King Kong but because of the time (3 Months) and budget constraints they decided to use a suit and use models to smash-up. Composer Akira Ifukube was brought in to make the music for the film and something else. Honda gave total control for the film’s music to Ifukube and told him that the music was the final part of the special effects. The monster also had to Roar (Reptiles don’t Roar).

“We all went down to the zoo to look for ideas but that was no use, there was no precedent in the natural world. We tried different bird noises but none of those worked either so in the end we used a double bass. First we fiddled with the peg box on the top of the instrument then we opened up the tail-piece pulled it away to give ourselves more room to move and then put on gloves to protect our hands. Then we played the double bass in a very unorthodox manner by scrapping our hands down the strings” – Akira Ifukube

The film starts out with a ship catching fire followed by many other ships. Then during a storm on a Japanese island, the village island is destroyed by some unknown force. During the time that follows you get this idea of something Big, Bad and Dangerous heading towards Japan and then it Arrives. The film became a huge hit in Japan and was nominated for two awards at the Japanese Academy Awards and won the award for Best Special Effects. It however did not win the award for best film which went to the Seven Samurai. The film was picked up by an American Distributor and was edited with extra scenes included starring Raymond Burr (Perry Mason and Ironside).  Godzilla became a hit around the world. 5 Months later Toho release Godzilla Raids again, this film was the first film to involve monster fights. Godzilla fights an Ankylosaurus type creature called Anguirus. Anguirus would later become one of Godzilla’s most trusted allies (and one of my personal favourites from the series).

At the time of release there was not really an Idea for a film series just an idea to make big monster movies and so Toho later released Rodan in 1956 and Mothra in 1961. It was not until the release of King Kong vs Godzilla was released in 1962 that the film series started due to the popularity of the film. The 1960’s saw many iconic films in the series and introduced several new characters to the series like Mothra and Rodan as well as inventing new characters all together like King Ghidorah. Godzilla also changed in character by becoming the hero of Mankind and saving mankind from monster threats. Baby Godzilla also turned up as well. Suits were still being used and are still used to the present day.

King Ghidorah 1964 - Present

Eiji Tsuburaya eventually left Toho to start his own production company making shows for television. This would lead to the highly successful Ultraman Series. Eiji Tsuburaya sadly passed away in 1970.

Godzilla eventually had competition in the form of Gamera made by film company Daiei. Gamera is a Giant Turtle who can breathe fire and fly with Rocket Boosters.

The 1970’s saw a much darker turn in story lines for Godzilla and also some scary films (well I found them scary). In 1971 Godzilla vs Hedorah was released and had a subliminal message in it with Godzilla attacking a monster made of Sludge. Director Yoshimitsu Banno wanted Godzilla to fight not just a monster but also pollution. Tomoyuki Tanaka was in hospital during the production of the film. When he recovered and watched the film he told Banno that he would never direct another film at Toho. Following Godzilla vs Hedorah was Godzilla vs Gigan. A film involving Godzilla, Anguirus, King Ghidorah and new monster Gigan. This film had almost a tag team feel about it with 2 Monsters fighting 2 other Monsters. Godzilla vs Megalon had the same idea but had new monster Megalon instead of King Ghidorah and new monster Jet Jaguar instead of Anguirus. Megalon did not do so well because of the constant use of Stock Footage. Toho followed this up with two Really Good films. Both of which introduced a new character which would go on to become one of the series’ most popular Monsters – Mecha-Godzilla. Mecha-Godzilla would also become one of Godzilla’s most powerful enemies (all 3 versions have come very close to killing the King of the Monsters). Godzilla vs Mecha-Godzilla was released in 1974 and Terror of Mecha-Godzilla was released in 1975. Terror of Mecha-Godzilla was the last Godzilla film directed by Ishiro Honda who sadly passed away in 1993. Terror of Mecha-Godzilla was the last in the Showa Series due to the crash in Japanese Cinema and an Oil Crisis as well.

In 1984 Godzilla returned in The Return of Godzilla (one of my top favourites in the series). This was the first film in the Heisei Series and a few things were changed. Godzilla’s suit was updated to make it much more realistic and more intimidating. Godzilla was no longer the Hero of mankind and returned to being an Indestructible threat. Another difference was that the previous films except the original were forgotten for the purpose of the story. So Godzilla did not fight Monsters in the last 30 years but only appeared in 1954 and has not appeared since – Until Now. The Return of Godzilla did not have any other giant Monsters except Godzilla. OK there was some big Insects but nothing Gigantic enough to fight Godzilla. The film also has some close up shots of Godzilla’s Foot showing some scale size for people wanting to know how big Godzilla is. There is also a brilliant scene where he pushes a Skyscraper so it will fall on top of a Flying Machine sent to attack him.

Following this film came many others in the series like Godzilla vs Biollante (one of only 3 films in the series I have not seen). They also brought back some Popular Monsters from the series like Mothra, Rodan, Mecha-Godzilla and King Ghidorah while also creating some new Monsters for the series like Mecha-King Ghidorah, Space Godzilla, Moguera, Destroyah and (one of my top favourite Monsters from the series) Battra. Baby Godzilla also made a return but had a more dinosaur look about him and the films also showed the life-cycle of Baby Godzilla as well with him starting out hatching from an egg, to becoming a bigger Baby Godzilla to finally becoming a mature Godzilla in Godzilla vs Destroyah. (2 Godzilla’s in one film even though one is a lot bigger).

Mothra 1961 - Present

Gamera films returned to Japanese cinema as well during the Heisei series with a more updated and realistic look. I have only seen Gamera 3: Awakening of Irys which is very enjoyable (it makes me want to watch the previous 2 Gamera Films in the series).

Godzilla vs Destroyah would become the last one in the Heisei Series and only the second film where Godzilla dies. He dies when his Nuclear Heart goes into Meltdown. However instead of destroying the earth as he goes into meltdown all his power goes into Godzilla Junior (who was killed by Destroyah earlier in the film) and brings Junior back to life but now as a fully grown Godzilla. Godzilla vs Destroyah has an interesting Story connection with the 1954 Original Godzilla. Godzilla gets killed in the original and in Destroyah bizarre creatures are found where Godzilla died in 1954. Momoko Kōchi plays the character of Emiko Yamane who was also in the 1954 original. Tokyo is not the only city to be attacked in Godzilla vs Destroyah, Hong Kong gets attacked at the beginning of the film. This was also the last film that Akira Ifukube provided the soundtrack, even though some of his work was used in the Millenium series. Ifukube sadly passed away in 2006. The film ends with a montage of clips from the first film and films from the Heisei series. One year after the release of Godzilla vs Destroyah Tomoyuki Tanaka sadly passed away.

In 1992 Sony were given the rights to make an American Godzilla film. After the success of Independence Day Sony hired Roland Emmerich and Dean Devlin to make the film, but they only agreed to do so if they were allowed to do what they wanted with the Movie.

In 1998 Godzilla was released and did very well at the box office earning $379,014,294 at the box office. However the fans were not so sure about it. Kenpachiro Satsuma who was in the suit between 1984 and 1997 walked out of a Tokyo Screening and told reporters “It’s not Godzilla; it does not have the spirit”. The film was not really a Godzilla film. Godzilla 1998 was just a monster movie with an Iconic name. Calling it something else might not have drawn the crowds in but giving it a name that people know about will make the crowds come. They were probably trying to make a Godzilla film but the film itself is not a Good representation of the King of the Monsters. Ok some parts of the film is actually quite good but it is no-where near as good as the Japanese Films. The creature in the film was later renamed by Shogo Tomiyama (President of Toho) to Zilla. He felt that the 1998 film took the God out of Godzilla. Godzilla is not some animal that can be harmed by Man Made Weapons. Godzilla is a Gigantic Indestructible Force of Nature. Modern Man Made weapons have no effect on Godzilla.

In December 1999 Godzilla returned but this time it was a Japanese Godzilla film. Godzilla 2000 (my joint second Favorite film) started the Millennium series. Each film in the series (except Tokyo S.O.S.) used the original as a launch point for the film. The idea works well and adds the idea of Godzilla being a legend that happened over 40 years previously. It also brought monster fights with it and once again created new Monsters for the series like Orga and Megaguiras while also bringing back some Monsters from the other series like King Ghidorah, Mothra and Mecha-Godzilla (also known as Kiryu in Godzilla Against Mecha-Godzilla). Also for some Monsters in the Millenium series it was the first time they appeared in Godzilla films in almost 30 years.

Mecha-Godzilla 1974 - Present

In 2001 Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All Out Attack was released. The film involved 3 Guardian Monsters and Godzilla. Even though not mentioned in the Title Baragon makes an appearance in the film. This is Baragon’s first appearance since the Showa Series and is a Good addition to the film. This is my Favorite film in the series and My Favorite film in the world. It is an amazing film. Tokyo S.O.S. is the only film in the Millennium series not to use the 1954 original as a starting off point. Tokyo S.O.S. was a direct sequel to the previous film Godzilla Against Mecha-Godzilla. Tokyo S.O.S. also contains one of the best and most mysterious post credits scenes in cinema history. A possible launching off point for a future film.

In 2004 it was an important year. Godzilla’s 50th Anniversary. So to celebrate Toho released Godzilla: Final Wars. Shogo Tomiyama decided to put the series on a 10 year break following this, but this film was amazing (my joint second Favorite film). It contained many Monsters that have not appeared in the series for 30 years. Some of them with improvements, in particular Gigan who now looked even more dangerous. Zilla also makes an appearance but does not last very long. Directed by Ryuhei Kitamura the film is a lot like Destroy all Monsters with a Giant Monster Battle Royal where all the worlds Monsters fight Godzilla.

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Since 2004 not much has happened with the series. Yoshimitsu Banno decided to try and release a 3D Godzilla film for IMAX Cinemas called Godzilla 3D to the Max. However this was later scrapped to make a new American Godzilla film. This is a reboot to the American series with Legendary Pictures producing it. The film is based on the Japanese Monster and is not related in any way to the 1998 film. Gareth Edwards has been signed on to direct and he is a fan of Godzilla so we all know it’s going to be what we want to see.  With a 2012 release to the film we will not have to wait long. Not only that it is now 2011 and in 2014 the 10 year break will be over.

“One hopes there is always this same reliable, Death Dealing, Fire Breathing, Mutant Dinosaur. You know so the creative’s just have fun with the humans in the foreground and leave Godzilla to his own devices” – Alex Cox

The future for Godzilla is uncertain at this point. We don’t know what the film makers plans are but Godzilla is not something they will forget about so I think it is more of a certainty that Godzilla will be back and continue to Smash, Crash, Pull Down and Destroy Cities worldwide while always being a Cinema Icon the world over. Godzilla will always be The King of The Monsters.

GENEPOOL (I hope you enjoyed reading this as much as I have enjoyed writing it)








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